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1d. Geographers and Their Space
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Humans are curious creatures, always wondering what lies beyond the horizon. Lewis and Clark did not describe themselves as geographers, but they might well have. Geography is the study of the surface of the earth. It is about people and places. It is about the physical character of a country, its climates and landscapes, and its biological environment.

Subject:
Ancient History
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
Ancient Civilizations
Date Added:
02/15/2018
25 Things
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This lesson will allow students to select and share what details are important on a topic. Groups of students will research a topic and then discuss and determine the top 25 important things someone should know about the topic.

Subject:
Applied Science
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Career and Technical Education
Education
English Language Arts
History
Life Science
Mathematics
Physical Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Erin Halovanic
Lynn Ann Wiscount
Vince Mariner
Date Added:
06/13/2021
3.1.1 What makes Michigan special?
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A remix of Michigan social studies resources all in one place. In this foundational lesson students are introduced to the ways geographers look at places and the questions they ask. Students begin by reviewing the concept of ‘community’ and the geography of their local community by completing a class chart.

Subject:
Physical Geography
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider Set:
Collabrify Roadmap Center
Author:
GIANTS
MC3
Michigan Open Book
Monique Coulman
Date Added:
03/07/2020
3.1.2 Where is Michigan Located?
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The Roadmap is a remix of Michigan resources all in one place. Students review relative and absolute (street address) location. They then use a Michigan map and cardinal directions to describe the relative location of their local community. Using a map of the United States and cardinal directions, students identify a variety of ways to describe the relative location of Michigan. The lesson concludes with a brief discussion of how location influences the development of a state. This lesson serves as the launching point for subsequent lessons in both history and economics.

Subject:
Physical Geography
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider Set:
Collabrify Roadmap Center
Author:
GIANTS
MC3
Michigan Open Book
Monique Coulman
Date Added:
03/07/2020
3.1.3 What are the Important Natural Characteristics of Michigan?
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After reviewing natural (physical) and human characteristics from Lesson 1, students use maps to identify and describe significant natural (physical) characteristics of Michigan including mountain ranges, sand dune areas, the Great Lakes, inland lakes and important rivers. In a connection to science students briefly explore how glaciers helped to create some of these natural (physical) characteristics. The lesson uses multiple resources including informational text, legends and photographs.

Subject:
Physical Geography
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider Set:
Collabrify Roadmap Center
Author:
GIANTS
MC3
Michigan Open Book
Monique Coulman
Date Added:
03/07/2020
3.1.4 What are the Important Natural Characteristics of Michigan?
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In this lesson students continue their study of the important natural (physical) characteristics of Michigan by exploring vegetation and climate. They begin by analyzing special purpose maps of forests and orchards. Next they are introduced to the concept of climate, connecting to science topics of weather and seasons from previous grades. In addition, they briefly explore the impact of the Great Lakes on climate. The lesson also includes a chart reading activity dealing with Michigan state symbols.

Subject:
Physical Geography
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider Set:
Collabrify Roadmap Center
Author:
GIANTS
MC3
Michigan Open Book
Monique Coulman
Date Added:
03/07/2020
3.1.5 Why are the Great Lakes great?
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Important bodies of water include the Great Lakes, inland lakes, rivers and waterfalls. In a connection to science students briefly explore how glaciers helped to create some of these natural (physical) characteristics. The lesson uses multiple resources including informational text, legends and photographs.

Subject:
Physical Geography
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider Set:
Collabrify Roadmap Center
Author:
GIANTS
MC3
Michigan Open Book
Monique Coulman
Date Added:
03/07/2020
3.1.6 What are the Important Human Characteristics in Michigan?
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The Roadmap is a remix of the Michigan Open Book, MC3 and GIANTS all in one place. In this lesson students continue their study of the geographic theme of ‘place’ by exploring significant human characteristics of Michigan including bridges, cities, highways and lighthouses. In addition, students explore how people interact with natural (physical) characteristics by creating human characteristics (e.g. bridges are built over rivers, towns are built along bays.)

Subject:
Physical Geography
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider Set:
Collabrify Roadmap Center
Author:
GIANTS
MC3
Michigan Open Book
Monique Coulman
Date Added:
03/07/2020
3.1.7 How can Michigan be Divided in Regions?
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The Roadmap is a remix of the Michigan Open Book, MC3 and GIANTS all in one place. This lesson expands upon the concept of region by having students invent ways to divide Michigan into regions. Students compare the Lower Peninsula and Upper Peninsula of Michigan and then explore other ways in which Michigan can be divided into regions based on common characteristics (e.g., the Thumb, the Fruit Belt). Finally students examine regions to which Michigan belongs. (e.g., Great Lakes Region, Midwest).

Subject:
Physical Geography
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider Set:
Collabrify Roadmap Center
Author:
GIANTS
MC3
Michigan Open Book
Monique Coulman
Date Added:
03/07/2020
3rd Grade Michigan Social Studies (Chapters 1-4)
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This Roadmap is a full year plan that covers the geography, economics, government and history of Michigan.

Subject:
History
Physical Geography
Social Science
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider Set:
Collabrify Roadmap Center
Author:
GIANTS
MC3
Michigan Open Book
Monique Coulman
Date Added:
03/11/2020
The 4-Point Backyard Diurnal Parallax Method
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On field, students have to image a given asteroid on two consecutive nights, producing two sets of images obtained over 10-15 minutes, each set separated by about 4-5 hours. In class, students have to process the images in order to measure the observed diurnal parallax and then determine the corresponding asteroid distance.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Eduardo Manuel Alvarez
Date Added:
12/11/2019
4th Grade Social Studies Geography "What Makes the United States Special? (Chapter 1)
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In this unit students explore the United States through the social studies discipline of geography. In exploring the United States in spatial terms, students first consider the location of the United States. They learn about and use a variety of geographic tools such as maps, globes, and satellite images to answer the question “Where is the United States?” Next, students examine the concept of place relative to the United States. They use songs, stories, photographs, and aerial images to investigate the question, “What is it like there?” and to describe significant physical and human characteristics. Students also use the concept of regions to compare sections of the United States. They build on their understanding that regions are defined by common characteristics and explore ways in which the United States can be divided into regions. Students then compare a region to which Michigan belongs with other regions in the United States using special purpose maps. In doing so, students examine geographic features such as elevation, climate, and patterns of population density in the United States. As a culminating project, students summarize what they have learned by creating a poster, picture book, Flipbook slide show or other visual describing the United States according to the geographic themes of location, place, and regions.

Subject:
Physical Geography
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider Set:
Collabrify Roadmap Center
Author:
MC3
Michigan Open Text Book
Monique Coulman
Date Added:
03/26/2020
6.2 Thermal Energy
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This unit on thermal energy transfer begins with students testing whether a new plastic cup sold by a store keeps a drink colder for longer compared to the regular plastic cup that comes free with the drink. Students find that the drink in the regular cup warms up more than the drink in the special cup. This prompts students to identify features of the cups that are different, such as the lid, walls, and hole for the straw, that might explain why one drink warms up more than the other.

Students investigate the different cup features they conjecture are important to explaining the phenomenon, starting with the lid. They model how matter can enter or exit the cup via evaporation However, they find that in a completely closed system, the liquid inside the cup still changes temperature. This motivates the need to trace the transfer of energy into the drink as it warms up. Through a series of lab investigations and simulations, students find that there are two ways to transfer energy into the drink: (1) the absorption of light and (2) thermal energy from the warmer air around the drink. They are then challenged to design their own drink container that can perform as well as the store-bought container, following a set of design criteria and constraints.

Subject:
Engineering
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Simulation
Student Guide
Unit of Study
Author:
Assessment Specialist David Fortus
BSCS Science Learning Ari Jamshidi
BSCS Science Learning Emily Harris
BSCS Science Learning Michael Novak
BSCS Science Learning Zoe Buck Bracey
Charles A. Center at UT-Austin Dawn Novak
Lindsey Mohan
Maple School Tyler Scaletta
North Shore Country Day School Katie Van Horne
Northwestern University Tracey Ramirez
Stanford University Abe Lo
Date Added:
08/04/2020
6.3 Weather, Climate & Water Cycling
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This unit on weather, climate, and water cycling is broken into four separate lesson sets. In the first two lesson sets, students explain small-scale storms. In the third and fourth lesson sets, students explain mesoscale weather systems and climate-level patterns of precipitation. Each of these two parts of the unit is grounded in a different anchoring phenomenon.

The unit starts out with anchoring students in the exploration of a series of videos of hailstorms from different locations across the country at different times of the year. The videos show that pieces of ice of different sizes (some very large) are falling out of the sky, sometimes accompanied by rain and wind gusts, all on days when the temperature of the air outside remained above freezing for the entire day. These cases spark questions and ideas for investigations, such as investigating how ice can be falling from the sky on a warm day, how clouds form, why some clouds produce storms with large amounts of precipitation and others don’t, and how all that water gets into the air in the first place.

The second half of the unit is anchored in the exploration of a weather report of a winter storm that affected large portions of the midwestern United States. The maps, transcripts, and video that students analyze show them that the storm was forecasted to produce large amounts of snow and ice accumulation in large portions of the northeastern part of the country within the next day. This case sparks questions and ideas for investigations around trying to figure out what could be causing such a large-scale storm and why it would end up affecting a different part of the country a day later.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Atmospheric Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Student Guide
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Author:
Assessment Specialist Colleen O’Brien
Boston College Emily Harris
BSCS Science Learning Audrey Mohan
BSCS Science Learning Dawn Novak
BSCS Science Learning Katie Van Horne
BSCS Science Learning Lindsey Mohan
BSCS Science Learning Tracey Ramirez
Columbia University Elisabeth Cohen
Indian Woods Middle School Ann Rivet
Indian Woods Middle School Whitney Smith
Lombard Middle School Vanessa Hannana
Michael Novak
Northwestern University Renee Affolter
Williston Central School Heather Galbreath
Date Added:
08/04/2020
7.1 Chemical Reactions & Matter Transformations
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Students' conceptual understanding of chemical reactions is foundational to much science learning. Understanding atomic level reactions is crucial for learning physical, life, earth, and space science. Even more importantly, they open up new windows of curiosity for students to see the world around them. By seventh grade, students are ready to take on the abstract nature of the interactions of atoms and molecules far too small to see.

To pique students’ curiosity and anchor the learning for the unit in the visible and concrete, students start with an experience of observing and analyzing a bath bomb as it fizzes and eventually disappears in the water. Their observations and questions about what is going on drive learning that digs into a series of related phenomena as students iterate and improve their models depicting what happens during chemical reactions. By the end of the unit, students have a firm grasp on how to model simple molecules, know what to look for to determine if chemical reactions have occurred, and apply their knowledge to chemical reactions to show how mass is conserved when atoms are rearranged.

Embedded in this unit are a variety of assessments, including self, peer, formative, and summative assessment tasks. This unit concludes with a transfer task in which students apply what they have figured out to two different related phenomena, elephant’s toothpaste and the crumbling of the marble that makes up the Taj Mahal.

Subject:
Physical Science
Chemistry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Date Added:
08/18/2020
7.4 Matter Cycling & Photosynthesis
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This unit on matter cycling and photosynthesis begins with students reflecting on what they ate for breakfast. Students are prompted to consider where their food comes from and consider which breakfast items might be from plants. Then students taste a common breakfast food, maple syrup, and see that according to the label, it is 100% from a tree.

Based on the preceding unit, students argue that they know what happens to the sugar in syrup when they consume it. It is absorbed into the circulatory system and transported to cells in their body to be used for fuel. Students explore what else is in food and discover that food from plants, like bananas, peanut butter, beans, avocado, and almonds, not only have sugars but proteins and fats as well. This discovery leads them to wonder how plants are getting these food molecules and where a plant’s food comes from.

Students figure out that they can trace all food back to plants, including processed and synthetic food. They obtain and communicate information to explain how matter gets from living things that have died back into the system through processes done by decomposers. Students finally explain that the pieces of their food are constantly recycled between living and nonliving parts of a system.

Subject:
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Hydrology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Module
Unit of Study
Author:
Assessment Specialist Kelsey Edwards
BSCS Science Learning Meghan McCleary
BSCS Science Learning Tyler Scaletta
Chicago Public Schools Katie Van Horne
Field Test Unit Lead and Reviewer
Hugh B. Bain Middle School Elizabeth Xeng de los Santos
James Ward School Mary Colannino
Jamie Noll
Maine Mathematics and Science Alliance Emily Harris
Northwestern University Christina Murzynski
Northwestern University Dawn Novak
Northwestern University Kate Cook-Whitt
Northwestern University Misty Richmond
Northwestern University Tara McGill
The Nora Project Michael Novak
University of California – Davis Cindy Passmore
University of Illinois Extension Katy Fattaleh
University of Illinois Extension Sue Gasper
University of Nevada – Reno Chris Griesemer
Date Added:
08/04/2020
8.2 Sound Waves
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In this unit, students develop ideas related to how sounds are produced, how they travel through media, and how they affect objects at a distance. Their investigations are motivated by trying to account for a perplexing anchoring phenomenon — a truck is playing loud music in a parking lot and the windows of a building across the parking lot visibly shake in response to the music.

They make observations of sound sources to revisit the K–5 idea that objects vibrate when they make sounds. They figure out that patterns of differences in those vibrations are tied to differences in characteristics of the sounds being made. They gather data on how objects vibrate when making different sounds to characterize how a vibrating object’s motion is tied to the loudness and pitch of the sounds they make. Students also conduct experiments to support the idea that sound needs matter to travel through, and they will use models and simulations to explain how sound travels through matter at the particle level.

Subject:
Physical Science
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Data Set
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Reading
Simulation
Student Guide
Unit of Study
Author:
Boston College Susan Kowalski
BSCS Science Learning Gail Housman
David Wooster Middle School Sara Ryner
Ideal Elementary School Jamie Noll
North Shore Country Day School Michael Novak
Northwestern University Chris Newlan
Northwestern University Tyler Scaletta
Renee Affolter
United Junior High School Katie Van Horne
Date Added:
08/05/2020
8.3 Forces at a Distance
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This unit launches with a slow-motion video of a speaker as it plays music. In the previous unit, students developed a model of sound. This unit allows students to investigate the cause of a speaker’s vibration in addition to the effect.

Students dissect speakers to explore the inner workings, and engineer homemade cup speakers to manipulate the parts of the speaker. They identify that most speakers have the same parts–a magnet, a coil of wire, and a membrane. Students investigate each of these parts to figure out how they work together in the speaker system. Along the way, students manipulate the components (e.g. changing the strength of the magnet, number of coils, direction of current) to see how this technology can be modified and applied to a variety of contexts, like MagLev trains, junkyard magnets, and electric motors.

Subject:
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Author:
BSCS Science Learning Joel Donna
BSCS Science Learning Kris Grymonpre
BSCS Science Learning Lindsey Mohan
Chicago Public Schools Betty Stennett
MA Thomas Clayton
Michigan State University Joseph Krajcik
Michigan State University Katie Van Horne
NJ Christina Schwarz
Northwestern University Will Reed
The Dana Center at University of Texas – Austin Michael Novak
University of Wisconsin River Falls Shelly Ledoux
Zoë Buck Bracey
Date Added:
08/04/2020
Accelerated Motion
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A complete model for describing 1-D accelerated motion (descriptive, motion maps, graphs and kinematic equations).  Begins with a paradigm lab of motion on an incline.  The lab utilizes Vernier Logger Pro motion detectors the way I implement it, but can be done with other methods of data collection.

Subject:
Physical Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Michigan Virtual
Author:
Terry Bochenek
Date Added:
06/30/2016
Acid-Base Solutions
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How do strong and weak acids differ? Use lab tools on your computer to find out! Dip the paper or the probe into solution to measure the pH, or put in the electrodes to measure the conductivity. Then see how concentration and strength affect pH. Can a weak acid solution have the same pH as a strong acid solution?

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Chris Malley
Kathy Perkins
Kelly Lancaster
Patricia Loeblein
Robert Parson
Date Added:
09/01/2010
Acoustic Mirrors
Rating

Students play and record the “Mary Had a Little Lamb” song using musical instruments and analyze the intensity of the sound using free audio editing and recording software. Then they use hollow Styrofoam half-spheres as acoustic mirrors (devices that reflect and focus sound), determine the radius of curvature of the mirror and calculate its focal length. Students place a microphone at the acoustic mirror focal point, re-record their songs, and compare the sound intensity on plot spectrums generated from their recordings both with and without the acoustic mirrors. A worksheet and KWL chart are provided.

Subject:
Mathematics
Geometry
Physical Science
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Nick Breen
Steven C. Thedford
Date Added:
08/11/2020
Advanced Igneous Petrology, Fall 2005
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Advanced Igneous Petrology covers the history of and recent developments in the study of igneous rocks. Students review the chemistry and structure of igneous rock-forming minerals and proceed to study how these minerals occur and interact in igneous rocks. The course focuses on igneous processes and how we have learned about them through studying a number of significant sites worldwide.

Subject:
Atmospheric Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Grove, Timothy L.
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Advanced Organic Chemistry, Spring 2007
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Application of structure and theory to the study of organic reaction mechanisms: stereochemical features including conformation and stereoelectronic effects; reaction dynamics, isotope effects and molecular orbital theory applied to pericyclic and photochemical reactions; and special reactive intermediates including carbenes, carbanions, and free radicals.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Movassaghi, Mohammad
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Advanced Seminar in Geology and Geochemistry: Organic Geochemistry, Fall 2005
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12.491 is a seminar focusing on problems of current interest in geology and geochemistry. For Fall 2005, the topic is organic geochemistry. Lectures and readings cover recent research in the development and properties of organic matter.

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Atmospheric Science
Chemistry
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Summons, Roger
Date Added:
01/01/2005
The Advantage of Machines
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating

In this lesson, students learn about work as defined by physical science and see that work is made easier through the use of simple machines. Already encountering simple machines everyday, students will be alerted to their widespread uses in everyday life. This lesson serves as the starting point for the Simple Machines Unit.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Glen Sirakavit
Janet Yowell
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Melissa Straten
Michael Bendewald
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Aerodynamics of Viscous Fluids, Fall 2003
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Boundary layers as rational approximations to the solutions of exact equations of fluid motion. Physical parameters influencing laminar and turbulent aerodynamic flows and transition. Effects of compressibility, heat conduction, and frame rotation. Influence of boundary layers on outer potential flow and associated stall and drag mechanisms. Numerical solution techniques and exercises. The major focus of 16.13 is on boundary layers, and boundary layer theory subject to various flow assumptions, such as compressibility, turbulence, dimensionality, and heat transfer. Parameters influencing aerodynamic flows and transition and influence of boundary layers on outer potential flow are presented, along with associated stall and drag mechanisms. Numerical solution techniques and exercises are included.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Merchant, Ali A.
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Aeronautics and Astronautics
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These courses, produced by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, introduce the fundamental concepts and approaches of aerospace engineering, highlighted through lectures on aeronautics, astronautics, and design. MIT˘ď‹ď_s Aerospace and Aeronautics curriculum is divided into three parts: Aerospace information engineering, Aerospace systems engineering, and Aerospace vehicles engineering. Visitors to this site will find undergraduate and graduate courses to fit all three of these areas, from Exploring Sea, Space, & Earth: Fundamentals of Engineering Design to Bio-Inspired Structures

Subject:
Engineering
Mathematics
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Date Added:
03/17/2011
Afterimage
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In this activity about light and perception, learners discover how a flash of light can create a lingering image called an "afterimage" on the retina of the eye. Learners will be surprised when they continue to see an image of a bright object after staring at it and looking away. Use this activity to introduce learners to principles of optics and perception as well as to explain why the full moon often appears larger when it is on the horizon than when it is overhead. This lesson guide also includes a few extensions like how to take "afterimage photographs."

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Exploratorium
Provider Set:
Science Snacks
Date Added:
09/04/2019
Agar Cell Diffusion
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CC BY-NC-SA
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All biological cells require the transport of materials across the plasma membrane into and out of the cell. By infusing cubes of agar with a pH indicator, and then soaking the treated cubes in vinegar, you can model how diffusion occurs in cells. Then, by observing cubes of different sizes, you can discover why larger cells might need extra help to transport materials.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Exploratorium
Provider Set:
Science Snacks
Date Added:
09/04/2019
All About Earth's Climate
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CC BY-SA
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In this informational text, elementary school readers learn about the difference between weather and climate and about components of the climate system. The text can be used to practice visualizing and other comprehension strategies. Available in K-2 and 3-5 grade bands and as an illustrated book as well as a text document, the story appears in the online magazine Beyond Weather and the Water Cycle.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Education
Reading Informational Text
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Ohio State University College of Education and Human Ecology
Provider Set:
Beyond Weather and the Water Cycle
Author:
Jessica Fries-Gaither
National Science Foundation
Date Added:
08/10/2020
Alquimétricos – Ecotechnological toys – Alquimétricos
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CC BY-SA
Rating

Alquimétricos is a collection of open source didactic toys: building blocks to mount structures and learn-while-playing about geometry, maths, architecture, mechanics, physics, chemistry, and much more. The initiative is focused on the design of DIY educational materials which are meant to be produced using a wide range of procedures, from ultra-low-cost-low-tech tool set (scissors and nails) to high-end-FabLab-standards (laser cutter, CNC milling, 3D printing), using an equally wide ranged material sort, including recycled packaging plastics, rubbers, cloths and cardboard composites throughout textile-embedded polymers, organic fibers or even lab-harvested fungus. Alquimétricos are meant to play, learn and share.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Computer Science
Engineering
Visual Arts
Electronic Technology
Mathematics
Physics
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Date Added:
10/13/2021
Aluminum-Air Battery
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Use aluminum foil, salt water, and activated charcoal to construct a simple battery strong enough to power a small motor or light.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Exploratorium
Provider Set:
Science Snacks
Date Added:
09/04/2019