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  • MI.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.4
11c. Economic Policy
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Until the 20th century the country abided by the laissez-faire policy, which required a free market with little intervention from government. With the Great Depression came Keynesian economics, or the opposite belief that the government should manage the economy. Today, United States economic policy lies somewhere in between åÑ government should regulate and sometimes manage, but should allow a free market whenever possible. Political and business leaders disagree on how much control is enough.

Subject:
Management
Political Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
American Government
Date Added:
02/15/2018
26f. Transcendentalism, An American Philosophy
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Transcendentalism is a very formal word that describes a very simple idea. People, men and women equally, have knowledge about themselves and the world around them that "transcends" or goes beyond what they can see, hear, taste, touch or feel.

Subject:
Philosophy
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
Date Added:
02/15/2018
42b. Muckrakers
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The print revolution enabled publications to increase their subscriptions dramatically. What appeared in print was now more powerful than ever. Writing to Congress in hopes of correcting abuses was slow and often produced zero results. Publishing a series of articles had a much more immediate impact. Collectively called muckrakers, a brave cadre of reporters exposed injustices so grave they made the blood of the average American run cold.

Subject:
Journalism
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
Date Added:
02/15/2018
88 Open Essays: A Reader for Students of Composition & Rhetoric
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PLEASE NOTE: Some K-12 sites block access to Google Docs where this file resides. If you are unable to access it, it is also available at https://human.libretexts.org/Bookshelves/Literature_and_Literacy/Book%3A_88_Open_Essays_-_A_Reader_for_Students_of_Composition_and_Rhetoric_(Wangler_and_Ulrich)

This book is a free and open resource for composition instructors and students, full of essays that could supplement OER rhetoric and writing texts that lack readings. All of the essays in this reader are versatile rhetorically and thematically. It is arranged alphabetically by author name. Each essay has a series of hashtags that apply to the essay in some way. You can search for essays thematically for topics like education, the environment, politics, or health. You can also search for essays based on composition concepts like analysis, synthesis, and research. You can search for essays that are based on shared values, essays that rely heavily on ethos, logos, or pathos, essays that are very kairos-dependent, and essays that are scholarly.

This collection was created in Google Docs so that it is easily adapted and edited.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Reading
Textbook
Author:
Sarah Wangler
Tina Ulrich
Date Added:
08/10/2020
About Writing: A Guide
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This writer’s reference condenses and covers everything a beginning writing student needs to successfully compose college-level work, including the basics of composition, grammar, and research. It is broken down into easy-to-tackle sections, while not overloading students with more information than they need. Great for any beginning writing students or as reference for advanced students!

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
OpenOregon
Author:
Robin Jeffrey
Date Added:
05/27/2015
Advanced Workshop in Writing for Social Sciences and Architecture (ELS), Spring 2007
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Advanced subject focusing on techniques, format, and prose style used in academic and professional life. Emphasis on writing as required in fields such as economics, political science, and architecture. Short assignments include: business letters, memos, and proposals that lead toward a written term project. Methods designed to deal with the special problems of those whose first language is not English. Successful completion satisfies Phase II of the Writing Requirement. This workshop is designed to help you write clearly, accurately and effectively in both an academic and a professional environment. In class, we analyze various forms of writing and address problems common to advanced speakers of English. We will often read one another's work.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Brennecke, Patricia W.
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Advanced Writing Seminar, Spring 2004
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Provides the opportunity for students to work intensively on developing the research claims and arguments in their writing. Open to both Master's and Ph.D. students and designed to maximize cross-fertilization between programs and research areas. First part devoted to reading and writing assignments that guide students in focusing on the connections between their research claims, the evidence that supports those claims, and the reasoning that underlies that support. In the latter part, students provide successive drafts of their project for group commentary and guidance in revision. The purpose of this seminar is to expose the student to a number of different types of writing that one may encounter in a professional career. The class is an opportunity to write, review, rewrite and present a point of view both orally and in written form.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Abbanat, Cherie
Date Added:
01/01/2004
American Authors: American Women Authors, Spring 2003
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Examines in detail the works of several American authors. Through close readings of poetry, novels, or plays, subject addresses such issues as literary influence, cultural diversity, and the writer's career. Topic: American Women Authors. This subject, crosslisted in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor, poverty, and working conditions for women (Fern, Davis, Wharton); captivity and slavery (Rowlandson, Jacobs); class struggle (Fern, Davis, Wharton, Larsen); race and identity (Keller, Jacobs, Larsen, Morrison); feminist revisions of history (Stowe, Morrison, Keller); and the myth of the fallen woman (take your pick). Essays and inclass reports will focus more particularly on specific writers and themes and will stress the skills of close reading, annotation, research, and uses of multimedia where appropriate. A classroom electronic archive has been developed for this course and will be available as a resource for images and other media materials.

Subject:
Literature
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kelley
Wyn
Date Added:
01/01/2003
American Classics, Spring 2006
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An examination of "classic" documents in American history from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, including writings by authors such as John Winthrop, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison; Frederick Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, and Abraham Lincoln; Horatio Alger, Jacob Riis and Thorstein Veblen; Franklin D. Roosevelt, Betty Friedan, Bob Dylan, and Martin Luther King, Jr. Music, taped speeches, television programs, motion pictures, and/or other visual materials may also be included. Class meetings consist primarily of discussions and there is one required museum trip.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Maier, Pauline
Date Added:
01/01/2006
American Literature I
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This course is a survey of American Literature from 1650 through 1820. It covers Early American and Puritan Literature, Enlightenment Literature, and Romantic Literature. It teaches in the context of American History and introduces the student to literary criticism and research.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
Lumen Learning
Provider Set:
Candela Courseware
Date Added:
02/16/2018
American Literature, Spring 2013
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This course studies the national literature of the United States since the early 19th century. It considers a range of texts - including, novels, essays, and poetry - and their efforts to define the notion of American identity. Readings usually include works by such authors as Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Emily Dickinson, and Toni Morrison.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kelley, Wyn
Date Added:
01/01/2013
The American Novel: Stranger and Stranger, Spring 2013
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This course covers works by major American novelists, beginning with the late 18th century and concluding with a contemporary novelist. The class places major emphasis on reading novels as literary texts, but attention is paid to historical, intellectual, and political contexts as well. The syllabus varies from term to term, but many of the following writers are represented: Rowson, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Wharton, James, and Toni Morrison. Previously taught topics include The American Revolution and Makeovers (i.e. adaptations and reinterpretation of novels traditionally considered as American "Classics"). May be repeated for credit with instructor's permission so long as the content differs.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Wyn Kelley
Date Added:
01/01/2013
Ancient Philosophy, Fall 2004
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This course will acquaint the student with some of the ancient Greek contributions to the Western philosophical and scientific tradition. We will examine a broad range of central philosophical themes concerning: nature, law, justice, knowledge, virtue, happiness, and death. There will be a strong emphasis on analyses of arguments found in the texts.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Haslanger, Sally
Date Added:
01/01/2004
The Ancient World: Greece, Fall 2004
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History of Ancient Greece from the Bronze Age to the death of Alexander. Major social, economic, political, and religious trends. Homer, heroism, and the Greek identity; the hoplite revolution and the rise of the city-state; Herodotus, Persia, and the (re)birth of history; Empire, Thucydidean rationalism, and the Peloponnesian War; Platonic constructs; Aristotle, Macedonia, and Hellenism. Emphasis on use of primary sources in translation.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Broadhead, William
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Animal Farm: Allegory and the Art of Persuasion
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Allegories are similar to metaphors: in both the author uses one subject to represent another, seemingly unrelated, subject. However, unlike metaphors, which are generally short and contained within a few lines, an allegory extends its representation over the course of an entire story, novel, or poem. This lesson plan will introduce students to the concept of allegory by using George Orwell’s widely read novella, Animal Farm, which is available on Project Gutenberg.

Subject:
Literature
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Author:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
12/11/2019
Arabic Poetry: Guzzle a Ghazal!
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The Bedouins of ancient Arabia and Persia made poetry a conversational art form. Several poetic forms developed from the participatory nature of tribal poetry. Today in most Arabic cultures, you may still experience public storytelling and spontaneous poetry challenges in the streets. The art of turning a rhyme into sly verbal sparring is considered a mark of intelligence and a badge of honor. Students will learn about the origins and structure of Arabic Poetry.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
World Cultures
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Author:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
12/11/2019
Argumentation and Communication, Fall 2006
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A writing practicum associated with 11.200 and 11.205 that focuses on helping students present their ideas in cogent, persuasive arguments and other analytical frameworks. Reading and writing assignments and other exercises stress the connections between clear thinking, critical reading, and effective writing.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Abbanat, Cherie
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Basics of Paragraph Writing
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This is a presentation for students on the basics of good paragraph writing. Presentation is meant as a review and a resource for student use.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
E Anderson
Date Added:
06/13/2021
Book 5, Music Across Classrooms: English Language Arts. Chapter 6: Celebrating Community With Art and Poetry (High School Version)
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In this lesson, students will consider the many kinds of communities that exist, and reflect on their own special ties to a community they are a part of. After watching the video for "Sunday Candy," and hearing the poetry of Chicago-based Kevin Coval, students will hold their own poetry slam featuring poems about community.

Subject:
Performing Arts
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachRock
Date Added:
12/13/2019
Book 5, Music Across Classrooms: English Language Arts. Chapter 8, Lesson 1: Blues, Poetry, and the Harlem Renaissance
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In this lesson, students will discuss how the ideals of the Harlem Renaissance and Locke's New Negro were exemplified by the poetry of Langston Hughes. Specifically, they will examine how Hughes incorporated the vernacular tradition of the Blues in his work, and identify the literary techniques Hughes employs to make his poetry so vivid.

Subject:
Performing Arts
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachRock
Date Added:
12/13/2019
Capitalism and Its Critics, Fall 2013
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Subject addresses the evolution of the modern capitalist economy and evaluates its current structure and performance. Various paradigms of economics are contrasted and compared (neoclassical, Marxist, socioeconomic, and neocorporate) in order to understand how modern capitalism has been shaped and how it functions in today's economy. Readings include classics in economic thought as well as contemporary analyses. Subject stresses general analytic reasoning and problem formulation rather than specific analytic techniques. May not be used for economics concentration. One economics HASS-D subject may be used as an economics elective for the economics major and minor. This course examines the implications of economic theories for social and political organization in the context of the historical evolution of industrial societies. Among the authors whose theories will be discussed are Ayn Rand, Milton Friedman, Karl Marx, Max Weber, Joseph Schumpeter, and John Kenneth Galbraith. Emphasis will be placed on class discussion of specific texts. Students will be encouraged to ground their views in concrete textual and empirical material and to consider the implications of different arguments for the understanding of personal, political, and economic events today.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Piore, Michael
Date Added:
01/01/2013
Civic Life, Chapter 4: How Has the Meaning of Citizenship Changed Over Time?
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A citizen is someone who is entitled to the legal rights granted by a state, and who is obligated to obey its laws and to fulfill certain duties. Living in the United States does not mean that someone is automatically a citizen. Permanent residents, people who have been lawfully admitted to the United States, are also granted certain legal rights and protections even if they are not citizens. For example, residents can live and work anywhere in the United States, attend public schools, join our armed forces and can also qualify for some Social Security benefits as well. Typically, people who are granted permanent resident status are immigrants who are related by birth or marriage to U.S. citizens or possess important job skills needed in the United States. Unlike citizens, permanent residents may not be able to hold public office or vote in elections. Why should someone consider becoming a citizen if they are not? Check out a list of all of the privileges of citizenship in the United States.

Subject:
Social Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
MIOpenBook
Provider Set:
Michigan Open Book Project
Author:
Annemarie Conway
Hillary Baker
Katie Hintz
Kelly Dutcher
Kymberli Wregglesworth
Travis Balzar
Date Added:
12/15/2017
Civic Life, Chapter 6: How Effective is the Legislative Branch in Governing?
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In a letter written to James Madison in 1797, Thomas Jefferson wrote, “The principle of the Constitution is that of a separation of legislative, Executive and Judiciary functions, except in cases specified. If this principle be not expressed in direct terms, it is clearly the spirit of the Constitution…” The separation of powers was one of the fundamental principles of the Constitution’s Framers. The Legislative Branch is sometimes referred as the “people’s branch” since the Founders believed and intended the legislative branch to closely reflect the will of the citizens.

Subject:
Social Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
MIOpenBook
Provider Set:
Michigan Open Book Project
Author:
Annemarie Conway
Hillary Baker
Katie Hintz
Kelly Dutcher
Kymberli Wregglesworth
Travis Balzar
Date Added:
12/15/2017
Civil War, Spring 2010
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This course surveys the social science literature on civil war. Students will study the origins of civil war, discuss variables that affect the duration of civil war, and examine the termination of conflict. This course is highly interdisciplinary and covers a wide variety of cases.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
U.S. History
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Petersen, Roger
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Classical Rhetoric and Modern Political Discourse, Fall 2009
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"This course is an introduction to the history, theory, practice, and implications of rhetoric, the art and craft of persuasion throughAnalyzing persuasive texts and speechesCreating persuasive texts and speechesThrough class discussions, presentations, and written Assignments and Labs, you will get to practice your own rhetorical prowess. Through the readings, you'll also learn some ways to make yourself a more efficient reader, as you turn your analytical skills on the texts themselves. This combination of reading, speaking, and writing will help you succeed in:learningto read and think criticallytechniques of rhetorical analysistechniques of argumentto enhance your written and oral discourse with appropriate figures of speechsome techniques of oral presentation and the use of visual aids and visual rhetoric."

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Visual Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Perelman, Leslie
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Comedy, Spring 2008
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course looks at comedy in drama, novels, and films from Classical Greece to the twentieth century. Focusing on examples from Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Cervantes, MoliĚŹre, Wilde, Chaplin, and Billy Wilder, along with theoretical contexts, the class examines comedy as a transgressive mode with revolutionary social and political implications. This is a Communications Intensive (CI) class with emphasis on discussion, and frequent, short essays.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kelley, Wyn
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Common Core Curriculum Grade 11 ELA: Making Evidence-Based Claims
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Making Evidence-Based Claims ELA/Literacy Units empower students with a critical reading and writing skill at the heart of the Common Core: making evidence-based claims about complex texts. These units are part of the Developing Core Proficiencies Program. This unit develops students€' abilities to make evidence-based claims through activities based on a close reading of the first chapter of W.E.B. Du Bois€' The Souls of Black Folk.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
02/16/2018
Common Core Curriculum Grade 12 ELA: Making Evidence-Based Claims
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Making Evidence-Based Claims ELA/Literacy Units empower students with a critical reading and writing skill at the heart of the Common Core: making evidence-based claims about complex texts. These units are part of the Developing Core Proficiencies Program. This unit develops students€' abilities to make evidence-based claims through activities based on a close reading of President Ronald Reagan€'s First Inaugural Address and Secretary Hillary Clinton€'s 2011 APEC Address.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
02/16/2018
Commonsense Composition
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This textbook follows California Language Arts Standards for grades 9-12 to provide a generalized understanding of composition and to serve as a supplementary aid to high school English teachers.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
CK-12 Foundation
Provider Set:
CK-12 FlexBook
Author:
Bruno, Crystal
Date Added:
08/20/2010
Creating a Resume
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Students will be able to create a complete resume representing their skills, experience, and educational background that will make them employable in todayŐs workforce. Students will create a resume using a Microsoft Word resume template.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Material Type:
Full Course
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Butte County Office of Education
Provider Set:
CTE Online
Date Added:
06/02/2020
Cultural Representation in the Media
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

 Advertisements can present a biased cultural representation that can affect our perceptions of others.  For example, a television show may show commercials with some groups of people more than others. A magazine may have advertisements and articles representing a certain type of people in a way that reinforces stereotypes.  Students need to be taught to recognize the culture that is being represented in the media they consume as well as the cultures that are absent from the same media.This is Part 5 of a 5 Part Unit: Media Manipulation: What Are They Really Saying?

Subject:
Information Science
Visual Arts
World Cultures
Marketing
Electronic Technology
Film and Music Production
English Language Arts
Cultural Geography
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Patricia Denton
Date Added:
08/05/2019
Daily Creative Assignments
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Inspired by the Learning to Love You More Project, the goal for these assignments is to incorporate creativity into your daily routine.For a designated period of time (one week, one month, two months) have students choose a different assignment to do each day and post online, in a wiki or blog (Please include the link to your class wiki or blog at the bottom of the page). They may use a camera or sketch pad to document their work and must give the work a title and description. Students are also encouraged to add new assignment ideas that they create to the list.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
ISKME
Author:
Megan Simmons
Date Added:
02/16/2018
Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Students examine the divided nature of Raskolnikov's character and personality. Then they uncover the divided natures of other characters"”a fact that becomes increasingly evident as the novel progresses to go beyond character analysis to comprehend Dostoyevsky's underlying themes. What does the novel imply about human nature? Dostoevsky clearly perceived that people are neither simple nor easily classified; they are often torn in opposite directions by forces both inside of and outside of themselves, sometimes with catastrophic results.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Date Added:
12/11/2019