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  • MITECS.A15-18.CC.3
Bestsellers: The Memoir, Spring 2010
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What is a "life" when it's written down? How does memory inform the present? Why are memoirs so popular? This course will address these questions and others, considering the relationship between biography, autobiography, and memoir and between personal and social themes. We will closely examine some recent memoirs: Tobias Wolff's This Boy's Life, Barack Obama's Dreams From My Father, Edwidge Danticat's Brother, I'm Dying, Ayaan Hirsi Ali's Infidel, and Alison Bechdel's Fun Home. Students will write two brief papers: a critical essay and an experiment in memoir.As a "Sampling," this class offers 6 units, with a strong emphasis on close reading, group discussion, focused writing, and research and presentation skills.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kelley, Wyn
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Bias in the Media -- Video Essay
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Students will build sensory awareness enhancing their perception and personal connections to the theme of race, power, and privilege in their community.  Students will take notes, build background knowledge, and begin to determine which types of media messages are reliable sources of information. They will research what form of media campaign most inspires them to act on an issue in 2019-20. Students develop media-literacy connections to further inquiry and investigate topics that stimulate their curiosity. The final product will be a 3-minute video essay. 

Subject:
Communication
Journalism
Film and Music Production
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Diane Walker
Brian Peck
Emily Wallace
Date Added:
08/05/2019
The Big Questions
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With recent advances in physics (and philosophy), we are finally able to make some headway into some of the most pressing questions of the universe. We will explore such topics as the big bang theory, time travel, relativity, extraterrestrial life, and string theory. We will attempt to answer some big questions such as: Was there a beginning of time? Will there be an end? Is time travel possible?

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Physics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Highlights for High School
Author:
Nicholas DiBella
Date Added:
04/07/2020
Bringing Algorithms into the Classroom
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Students will take a sequence of events or steps for some process and create an algorithm. This could apply to any content area. They will display the algorithm in flowchart form. This activity can be modified for all grade levels and content areas.

Subject:
Computer Science
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Life Science
Mathematics
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Cheryl Wilson
Date Added:
08/28/2020
CP 18: Teaching In and Through the Arts
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In the EL Education model, arts are celebrated as a central aspect of learning and life. Schools teach art as an academic discipline and also in core academic subjects, where it engages students in problem solving, planning, and perseverance. They celebrate the unique capacity of the arts to express truth, beauty, and joy. Student exhibitions of learning feature the arts along with other subjects. Schools are filled with student artwork, which is displayed in a way that honors the work. Artistic performances are points of pride for the school. Arts are often used as a window into disciplinary content in other academic subjects (e.g., ancient Greek architecture as an entry point to ancient Greek civilization, protest songs as a case study when learning about the civil rights movement). The arts also provide opportunities to explore diverse cultures, perspectives, and regions of the world.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
EL Education
Date Added:
11/20/2018
Civil War, Spring 2010
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This course surveys the social science literature on civil war. Students will study the origins of civil war, discuss variables that affect the duration of civil war, and examine the termination of conflict. This course is highly interdisciplinary and covers a wide variety of cases.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
U.S. History
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Petersen, Roger
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Communicating Across Cultures, Spring 2005
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In an increasingly interconnected world, communicating across cultures is a crucial skill in the international networks of business, science, and technology. Subject examines a range of communication styles and techniques resulting from different cultural norms and traditions. It begins with a general theoretical framework and then moves into case studies. Topics include understanding the relationship between communication and culture, differences in verbal and non-verbal communication styles, barriers to intercultural communication, modes of specific cross-cultural communication activities (e.g. argumentation, negotiation, conflict resolution) and intercultural adjustment. Case studies explore specific ways of communicating in Asian and European cultures. Graduate students are expected to complete additional assignments. Taught in English.It has become commonplace knowledge that globalization is one of the major forces shaping our world. If we look at the spread of information, ideas, capital, media, cultural artifacts--or for that matter, people--we can see the boundaries and borders that have historically separated one country or one group from another are becoming more and more permeable. For proof of this close to home, you need only to look at the composition of the MIT student body: 8 percent of the undergraduates and 37 percent of the graduate students are from 109 different countries. "Communicating Across Cultures" is designed to help you meet the challenges of living in a world in which, increasingly, you will be asked to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. Its primary goals are to help you become more sensitive to intercultural communication differences, and to provide you with the knowledge and skills that will help you interact successfully with people from cultures other than your own. We hope the course will accomplish those goals by exposing you to some of the best writers and scholars on the subject of intercultural communication, and by giving you a variety of opportunities to practice intercultural communication yourself. As you read the syllabus for this course, we hope you get a sense of our commitment to making this course a rewarding experience for you.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Bernd Breslow
Lori
Widdig
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Contemporary Literature: Literature, Development, and Human Rights, Spring 2008
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Subject focuses on fiction, drama, and poetry and possibly films inspired by these topics mostly of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Brouillette, Sarah
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Court Documents Related to Martin Luther King, Jr., and Memphis Sanitation Workers
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This lesson provides fliers and other documents related to the demonstration in Memphis on March 28, 1968. On that day, students near the end of the march broke windows of businesses. Looting ensued. The march was halted. King was deeply distressed by the violence. He and fellow leaders negotiated a commitment to nonviolence among disagreeing factions in Memphis, and another march was planned for April 8. On April 4, as he stepped out of his motel room to go to dinner, he was assassinated.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Archives and Records Administration
Date Added:
01/09/2007
DIST "Digital Storytelling for Spreading and Promoting Entrepreneurship"
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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Here you can find a Guide, addressed to teachers on the use of storytelling and of the videos produced for training purposes, within the project DIST.
An E-course addressed to trainers on how to enhance the sense of initiative and entrepreneurship in their students,
2 E-courses, one addressed to aspirant entrepreneurs and one addressed to entrepreneurs, to enhance their sense of initiative and entrepreneurship.
Some Videos featuring young and valuable European managers telling their professional history.
Other information about the DIST project here www.distproject.eu

Subject:
Business and Communication
Career and Technical Education
Education
Material Type:
Full Course
Lesson Plan
Student Guide
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
AOA
ASEV
Cdi Manager
DIST
FCI
Partners
Pratika
ULO
Date Added:
03/20/2020
Darwin and Design, Fall 2010
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Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Anthropology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
James Paradis
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Digital Poetry, Fall 2005
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This class investigates theory and practice of digital or new media poetry with emphasis on workshop review of digital poetry created by students. Each week students examine published examples of digital poetry in a variety of forms including but not limited to soundscapes, hypertext poetry, animation, code poems, interactive games, location-based poems using handheld devices, digital video and wikis.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Barrett, Edward
Date Added:
01/01/2005
The Economic History of Work and Family, Spring 2005
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Explores the changing map of the public and the private in pre-industrial and modern societies and examines how that map affected men's and women's production and consumption of goods and leisure. The reproductive strategies of women, either in conjunction with or in opposition to their families, is another major theme. How did an ideal of the "domestic" arise in the early modern west, and to what extent did it limit the economic position of women? How has it been challenged, and with what success, in the post-industrial period? Focuses on western Europe since the Middle Ages and on the United States, but some attention to how these issues have played themselves out in non-Western cultures. This course will explore the relation of women and men in both pre-industrial and modern societies to the changing map of public and private (household) work spaces, examining how that map affected their opportunities for both productive activity and the consumption of goods and leisure. The reproductive strategies of women, either in conjunction with or in opposition to their families, will be the third major theme of the course. We will consider how a place and an ideal of the "domestic" arose in the early modern west, to what extent it was effective in limiting the economic position of women, and how it has been challenged, and with what success, in the post-industrial period. Finally, we will consider some of the policy implications for contemporary societies as they respond to changes in the composition of the paid work force, as well as to radical changes in their national demographic profiles. Although most of the material for the course will focus on western Europe since the Middle Ages and on the United States, we will also consider how these issues have played themselves out in non-western cultures.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
McCants, Anne Elizabeth Conger
Date Added:
01/01/2005
End of Nature, Spring 2002
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A brief history of conflicting ideas about mankind's relation to the natural environment as exemplified in works of poetry, fiction, and discursive argument from ancient times to the present. What is the overall character of the natural world? Is mankind's relation to it one of stewardship and care, or of hostility and exploitation? Readings include Aristotle, The Book of Genesis, Shakespeare, Descartes, Robinson Crusoe, Swift, Rousseau, Wordsworth, Darwin, Thoreau, Faulkner, and Lovelock's Gaia. This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the growth of ideas about nature and the natural environment of mankind. The term nature in this context has to do with the varying ways in which the physical world has been conceived as the habitation of mankind, a source of imperatives for the collective organization and conduct of human life. In this sense, nature is less the object of complex scientific investigation than the object of individual experience and direct observation. Using the term "nature" in this sense, we can say that modern reference to "the environment" owes much to three ideas about the relation of mankind to nature. In the first of these, which harks back to ancient medical theories and notions about weather, geographical nature was seen as a neutral agency affecting or transforming agent of mankind's character and institutions. In the second, which derives from religious and classical sources in the Western tradition, the earth was designed as a fit environment for mankind or, at the least, as adequately suited for its abode, and civic or political life was taken to be consonant with the natural world. In the third, which also makes its appearance in the ancient world but becomes important only much later, nature and mankind are regarded as antagonists, and one must conquer the other or be subjugated by it.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Philosophy
Religious Studies
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kibel, Alvin C.
Date Added:
01/01/2002
Foundations of Western Culture II, Fall 2002
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Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts; literary, philosophical, sociological; studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fuller, Mary C.
Date Added:
01/01/2002
The Freedom Riders and the Popular Music of the Civil Rights Movement
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The American civil rights movement incorporated a variety of cultural elements in their pursuit of political and legal equality under law. This lesson will highlight the role of music as a major influence through the use of audio recordings, photographs, and primary documents. Students will participate in their own oral history, examine lyrics, and work with case studies such as the Freedom Rides to gain an appreciation of how music influenced the early 1960s.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Date Added:
12/11/2019
French 2 Clothing Shopping
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CC BY
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This 1-2 day lesson plan is created to be used in a blended learning 1:1 environment. Students will learn vocabulary for clothes, they will learn how to describe them (color, size, style) and buy them in a store.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Michigan Virtual
Author:
Erin Cambron
Date Added:
07/24/2017
German Culture, Media, and Society, Fall 2006
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The topic for Fall 2006 is short film and radio plays. This course investigates current trends and topics in German literary, theater, film, television, radio, and other media arts productions. Students analyze media texts in the context of their production, reception, and distribution as well as the public debates initiated by these works. The topic for Fall 2006 is German Short Film, a popular format that represents most recent trends in film production, and German Radio Art, a striving genre that includes experimental radio plays, sound art, and audio installations. Special attention will be given to the representation of German minorities, contrasted by their own artistic expressions reflecting changes in identity and a new political voice. Students have the opportunity to discuss course topics with a writer, filmmaker, and/or media artist from Germany. The course is taught in German.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fendt, Kurt
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Good Food: The Ethics and Politics of Food Choices, Spring 2017
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This course explores the values (aesthetic, moral, cultural, religious, prudential, political) expressed in the choices of food people eat. It analyzes the decisions individuals make about what to eat, how society should manage food production and consumption collectively, and how reflection on food choices might help resolve conflicts between different values.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Ecology
Nutrition
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Sally Haslanger
Date Added:
01/01/2012
Introduction to the History of Technology, Fall 2006
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This course is an introduction to the consideration of technology as the outcome of particular technical, historical, cultural, and political efforts, especially in the United States during the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics include industrialization of production and consumption, development of engineering professions, the emergence of management and its role in shaping technological forms, the technological construction of gender roles, and the relationship between humans and machines.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Electronic Technology
Manufacturing
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Mindell, David
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Launching the New U.S. Navy
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This lesson tells how and why our Navy was created. After the Revolutionary War, Barbary pirates preyed on American vessels and held seamen for ransom. In 1794, Congress reestablished the Navy with authorization for six vessels.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Archives and Records Administration
Date Added:
10/28/2003
The Lewis and Clark Expedition
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This lesson presents 13 documents and photos related to the 1804-6 expedition into the newly acquired Louisiana Territory. The documents include a list of Indian presents Lewis purchased, his receipts for wine and tobacco, Jefferson's letter to Madison announcing the purchase of Louisiana, and Jefferson's message to Congress communicating the discoveries of the expedition.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Archives and Records Administration
Date Added:
08/07/2000
Literary Interpretation: Beyond the Limits of the Lyric, Fall 2006
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Introduces practice and theory of literary criticism. Seminar focuses on topics such as the history of critical methods and techniques, and the continuity of certain subjects in literary history. Instruction and practice in oral and written communication. Topic: Theory and Use of Figurative Language.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Tapscott, Stephen
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Literary Interpretation: Literature and Photography: The Image, Fall 2005
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Introduces practice and theory of literary criticism. Seminar focuses on topics such as the history of critical methods and techniques, and the continuity of certain subjects in literary history. Instruction and practice in oral and written communication. Topic: Theory and Use of Figurative Language.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Tapscott, Stephen
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Medieval Economic History in Comparative Perspective, Spring 2012
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This course will survey the conditions of material life and changing social and economic conditions in medieval Europe with reference to the comparative context of contemporary Islamic, Chinese, and central Asian experiences. Subject covers the emergence and decline of feudal institutions, the transformation of peasant agriculture, living standards and the course of epidemic disease, and the ebb and flow of long-distance trade across the Eurasian system. Particular emphasis will be placed on the study of those factors, both institutional and technological, which have contributed to the emergence of capitalist organization and economic growth in Western Europe in contrast to the trajectories followed by the other major medieval economies.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Anne McCants
Date Added:
01/01/2012
Modern Poetry, Spring 2002
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Consideration of some substantial twentieth-century poetic voices. Authors vary, but may include Moore, Frost, Eliot, Stevens, and Pound. This course considers some of the substantial early twentieth-century poetic voices in America. Authors vary, but may include Moore, Frost, Eliot, Stevens, and Pound. We'll read the major poems by the most important poets in English in the 20th century, emphazinig especially the period between post-WWI disillusionment and early WW II internationalism (ca. 1918-1940). Our special focus this term will be how the concept of "the Image" evolved during this period. The War had undercut beliefs in master-narratives of nationalism and empire, and the language-systems that supported them (religious transcendence, rationalism and formalism). Retrieving energies from the Symbolist movements of the preceding century, early 20th century poets began to rethink how images carry information, and in what ways the visual, visionary, and verbal image can take the place of transcendent beliefs. New theories of linguistics and anthropology helped to advance this interest in the artistic/religious image. So did Freud. So did Charlie Chaplin films. We'll read poems that pay attention both to this disillusionment and to the compensatory joyous attention to the image: to ideas of the poet-as-language-priest, aesthetic-experience-as-displaced-religious impulse, to poetry as faith, ritual, and form.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Tapscott, Stephen
Date Added:
01/01/2002
Nelson Mandela & South Africa
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

After more than 30 years in prison and an historic election that for the first time in the nation's history included all citizens regardless of race, Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela became President of the Republic of South Africa on May 10, 1994. This Teacher's Guide includes resources for teaching about the brutality of apartheid, the resilience of the nation's people, the leadership of Nelson Mandela, and primary source materials that will inform discussion about the country's emergence in the world.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
History
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Date Added:
12/11/2019
Not "Indians," Many Tribes: Native American Diversity
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Students study the interaction between environment and culture as they learn about three vastly different indigenous groups in a game-like activity that uses vintage photographs, traditional stories, photos of artifacts, and recipes.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Date Added:
12/11/2019
A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society, Spring 2012
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This course is an introduction to modern Indian culture and society through films, documentaries, short stories, novels, poems, and journalistic writing. The principal focus is on the study of major cultural developments and social debates in the last sixty five years of history through the reading of literature and viewing of film clips. The focus will be on the transformations of gender and class issues, representation of nationhood, the idea of regional identities and the place of the city in individual and communal lives. The cultural and historical background will be provided in class lectures. The idea is to explore the "other Indias" that lurk behind our constructed notion of a homogeneous national culture.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Sunil H. Sharma
Date Added:
01/01/2012
People and Other Animals, Fall 2013
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This class provides a historical survey of the ways that people have interacted with their closest animal relatives, for example: hunting, domestication of livestock, exploitation of animal labor, scientific study of animals, display of exotic and performing animals, and pet keeping. Themes include changing ideas about animal agency and intelligence, our moral obligations to animals, and the limits imposed on the use of animals.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Anthropology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ritvo, Harriet
Date Added:
01/01/2013
Popular Culture and Narrative: Literature, Comics, and Culture, Fall 2010
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In this course, we will investigate popular culture and narrative by focusing on the relationship between literary texts and comics. Several questions shape the syllabus and provide a framework for approaching the course materials: How do familiar aspects of comics trace their origins to literary texts and broader cultural concerns? How have classic comics gone on to influence literary fiction? In what ways do contemporary graphic narratives bring a new kind of seriousness of purpose to comics, blurring what's left of the boundaries between the highbrow and the lowbrow? Readings and materials for the course range from the nineteenth century to the present, and include novels, short stories, essays, older and newer comics, and some older and newer films. Expectations include diligent reading, active participation, occasional discussion leading, and two papers.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Picker, John
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Prizewinners, Spring 2007
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This 6-unit subject gives students the opportunity to immerse themselves in the poetry of two living Nobel Laureates: the Caribbean poet, Derek Walcott, and the Northern-Irish poet, Seamus Heaney. We will begin and end the semester with their magnificent epic works: Heaney's translation of the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf, and Walcott's Omeros (a modern epic set in the West Indies). Between these major narrative poems, we will read a rich selection of their shorter poems, as well as some of their reflections in prose on what poetry does, on what other poets do, and what it means to write in English from the historical and political situation of Northern Ireland (for Heaney) or the Caribbean (for Walcott).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fuller, Mary
Date Added:
01/01/2007
The Programming Historian 2: Introduction to Google Maps and Google Earth
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Google Maps and Google Earth provide an easy way to start creating digital maps. With a Google Account you can create and edit personal maps by clicking on My Places. In the new Google Maps interface, click on the gear menu [icon] at the upper right of the menu bar, and select My Places. The new (as of summer 2013) interface provides a new way of creating custom maps: Google Maps Engine Lite allows users to import and add data onto the map to visualize trends.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
Center for History and New Media
Author:
Niche Canada
Roy Rosenzweig
Date Added:
01/22/2020
Race and Identity in American Literature: Keepin' it Real Fake, Spring 2007
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Rating

This course explores the ways in which various American artists view race and class as performed or performable identities. Discussions will focus on some of the following questions: What does it mean to act black, white, privileged, or underprivileged? What do these artists suggest are the implications of performing (indeed playing at or with) racial identity, ethnicity, gender, and class status? How and why are race and class status often conflated in these performances?

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Alexandre, Sandy
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Romantic Poetry, Spring 2005
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Close readings of the major British Romantic poets (Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Scott, Shelley, Keats), perhaps including some of the period's important fiction writers (e.g. Mary Shelley, Walter Scott). Some attention to literary and historical context. Lecture/discussion; at least two papers.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jackson, Noel
Date Added:
01/01/2005