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  • World History
The Age of Reason: Europe from the 17th to the Early 19th Centuries, Spring 2011
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This course asks students to consider the ways in which social theorists, institutional reformers, and political revolutionaries in the 17th through 19th centuries seized upon insights developed in the natural sciences and mathematics to change themselves and the society in which they lived. Students study trials, art, literature and music to understand developments in Europe and its colonies in these two centuries. Covers works by Newton, Locke, Voltaire, Rousseau, Marx, and Darwin.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ravel, Jeffrey S.
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Asia in the Modern World: Images & Representations
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We will explore images that pertain to the emergence of Japan as a modern state. We will focus on images that depict Japan as it comes into contact with the rest of the world after its long and deep isolation during the feudal period. We will also cover city planning of Tokyo that took place after WWII, and such topics as the 1964 Tokyo Olympics.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
High School Highlights
Author:
Shigeru Miyagawa
Date Added:
12/13/2019
Attacks on American Soil: Pearl Harbor and September 11
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CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to compare American responses to Pearl Harbor and September 11. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Albert Robertson
Date Added:
01/20/2016
Canadian History: Post-Confederation
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CC BY
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This textbook introduces aspects of the history of Canada since Confederation. “Canada” in this context includes Newfoundland and all the other parts that come to be aggregated into the Dominion after 1867. Much of this text follows thematic lines. Each chapter moves chronologically but with alternative narratives in mind. What Aboriginal accounts must we place in the foreground? Which structures (economic or social) determine the range of choices available to human agents of history? What environmental questions need to be raised to gain a more complete understanding of choices made in the past and their ramifications? Each chapter is comprised of several sections and some of those are further divided. In many instances you will encounter original material that has been contributed by other university historians from across Canada who are leaders in their respective fields. They provide a diversity of voices on the subject of the nation’s history and, thus, an opportunity to experience some of the complexities of understanding and approaching the past. Canadian History: Post-Confederation includes Learning Objectives and Key Points in most chapter sections, intended to help identify issues of over-arching importance. Recent interviews with historians from across Canada have been captured in video clips that are embedded throughout the web version of the book. At the end of each chapter, the Summary section includes additional features: Key Terms, Short Answer Exercises, and Suggested Readings. The key terms are bolded in the text, and collected in a Glossary in the appendix.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Open Textbooks
Date Added:
01/01/2016
Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen
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CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Albert Robertson
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Einstein, Oppenheimer, Feynman: Physics in the 20th Century, Spring 2011
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This course covers the role of physics and physicists during the 20th century, focusing on Einstein, Oppenheimer, and Feynman. Beyond just covering the scientific developments, institutional, cultural, and political contexts will also be examined.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
World History
Physics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kaiser, David
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Esri GeoInquiries™ for schools
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GeoInquiries™ are short, standards-based inquiry activities for teaching map-based content found in commonly used textbooks. Each activity is designed using a common inquiry model and can be presented quickly from a single computer and projector or modified for students’ hands-on engagement. Collections of 15-20 activities per topic complement your curriculum throughout the year.

Incorporates use of maps into every activity.

Various content areas and levels, aligned to standards, all CC By NC SA

Subject:
Environmental Science
English Language Arts
History
U.S. History
World History
Mathematics
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Date Added:
03/19/2019
Europe in Crisis: The World Wars in Europe
Read the Fine Print
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World War I and World War II are often seen as one large war by historians. We will look at both wars from a political, military and social perspective, focusing on the effect that these wars had on Europe. We might also discuss non-European aspects on the war, though in less depth.

Topics include the buildup to WWI, trench warfare, the Treaty of Versaiiles, the rise of the Nazi party, re-armament, and the entrance of America into WWII, among many other topics relating to the two world wars.

This class is designed for students who have not studied European history in-depth before.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Highlights for High School
Author:
Michelle Bentivegna
Date Added:
04/07/2020
Exploration of the Americas
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CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore early exploration of the Americas. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
World History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Kerry Dunne
Date Added:
01/20/2016
France, 1660-1815: Enlightenment, Revolution, Napoleon, Spring 2011
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This course covers French politics, culture, and society from Louis XIV to Napoleon Bonaparte. Attention is given to the growth of the central state, the beginnings of a modern consumer society, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, including its origins, and the rise and fall of Napoleon.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jeffrey S.
Ravel
Date Added:
01/01/2011
GIANTS.7th.U7.Lesson3
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7– G6.1.1 Investigations Designed for World History Eras 1-4
Conduct research on global topics and issues, compose persuasive essays, and develop a plan for action. Students investigate contemporary topics and issues that they have studied in an ancient world history context. The investigations may be addressed at the conclusion of each Era or may be included at the conclusion of the course.

7-H1.4.3. Use historical perspectives to analyze global issues faced by humans long ago and today.
7-G1.2.1 Explain why maps of the same place may vary as a result of new knowledge and/or advances in science and technology
7-G4.4.1 - Identify and explain factors that contribute to conflict and cooperation between and among cultural groups (e.g. natural resources, power, culture, wealth)
7-G4.4.2 Describe examples of cooperation and conflict within the era under study.
7-C1.1.1 Compare and contrast principles and competing ideas about the purposes of government in historical societies.
7-C1.1.2 - Examine what it has meant to be a citizen in the era under study.
7-C3..6.2 Compare and contrast various forms of government in the eras under study.
7-C4.3.1 - Explain how governmental systems addressed issues and formed policies throughout history and how those policies may not be consistent with our views on similar issues today.
7-E2.3.1 - Explain how governments during the eras under study made decisions that impacted the economy of that society and other societies.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Date Added:
05/21/2021
How did Islam develop and grow throughout the world?
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7 – W3.2.1 Identify and describe the beliefs of the major world religions.
7 – W3.2.2 Locate the geographical center of major religions and map the spread through the 3rd century C.E./A.D. (G)
7 – W4.1.2 World Religions -- Using historical documents and historical and current maps, analyze the spread and interactions of major world religions from 300-1500 C.E. (G)
7 – G4.4.2 Describe examples of cooperation and conflict within the era under study.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Interactive
Date Added:
05/21/2021
How did we get here?
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This unit emphasizes the diaspora of human history.

 

Sixth graders are by nature a myopic people, and constantly in danger of not examining their own assumptions. Teaching large scale human history as a beginning to a closer study of culture, movement patterns and events allows students to understand the miraculous conditions that allowed humans to flourish. The perspective we take in this unit also challenges students to consider that the choices we make always provide a set of positive and negative consequences. In past pedagogy, the shift from hunting and gathering to agriculture was taught as the catalyst of human progress. While that is not entirely wrong, it limits students' thinking by not considering the things we lost with this "opportunity cost."

 

In keeping with the new geography-heavy 2015 standards, this unit begins with a role-playing simulation that asks students to learn specific biomes to imagine they are plopped down in a certain region of the world, with nothing but a basic tool kit (no clothing, food, or shelter!). Right away students understand the complexity of early survival and the interrelationship with the environment. Then, building on the interpretive skills they learned in Unit one, student examine cave paintings to hypothesis lifestyle choices and necessities for early paleolithic peoples. Students recall the mapping skills learned in Unit One to get a visual perspective of the human diaspora in the next lesson, which maps the migration out of Africa, and sets the stage to understanding the next big topic: shifting from hunting and gathering to an agrarian way of life. But first, students will culminate their learning of early humans in an analysis of the issue of who gets the rights to study Kennewick man's remains.

 

**From the new AAPS 6th grade curriculum; written by Rachel Toon for ATLAS

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Michigan Virtual
Author:
Emily Zheutlin
Date Added:
10/11/2017
Jewish History from Biblical to Modern Times, Fall 2007
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"This course explores how our views of Jewish history have been formed and how this history can explain the survival of the Jews as an ethnic/religious group into the present day. Special attention is given to the partial and fragmentary nature of our information about the past, and the difficulties inherent in decoding statements about the past that were written with a religious agenda in mind. It also considers complex events in Jewish history -- from early history as portrayed in the Bible to recent history, including the Holocaust."

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Temin, Peter
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Latin American Revolutionaries
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CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore leaders of Latin American revolutions. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Albert Robertson
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Lesson: President Truman's Decision to Use The Bomb
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President Truman was faced with the daunting decision of using the new atomic bomb during WWII to end the war. He considered a number of options before deciding to use the bomb. Was this the right decision? Was President Truman 's decision justified? Should he have used one of his other options....?

Subject:
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Andrew Green
Date Added:
07/16/2020