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7th Grade Social Studies- Ancient World History
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Does geography determine destiny? This Unit encompasses the prehistory eras 1 and 2 of the State of Michigan Standards. It includes essential vocabulary, resources to teach migration, Paleolithic life, and Neolithic time eras. This unit will also help to teach timelines and includes an online book resource along with a reading guide. Students will learn what has been discovered about prehistory and how historians know what we know. This unit includes geography its effects on the first peoples and the continuous effects of our environment on life today.

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Michigan Virtual
Author:
Amy Striegle
Date Added:
06/30/2016
Canadian History: Post-Confederation
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No Strings Attached
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This textbook introduces aspects of the history of Canada since Confederation. “Canada” in this context includes Newfoundland and all the other parts that come to be aggregated into the Dominion after 1867. Much of this text follows thematic lines. Each chapter moves chronologically but with alternative narratives in mind. What Aboriginal accounts must we place in the foreground? Which structures (economic or social) determine the range of choices available to human agents of history? What environmental questions need to be raised to gain a more complete understanding of choices made in the past and their ramifications? Each chapter is comprised of several sections and some of those are further divided. In many instances you will encounter original material that has been contributed by other university historians from across Canada who are leaders in their respective fields. They provide a diversity of voices on the subject of the nation’s history and, thus, an opportunity to experience some of the complexities of understanding and approaching the past. Canadian History: Post-Confederation includes Learning Objectives and Key Points in most chapter sections, intended to help identify issues of over-arching importance. Recent interviews with historians from across Canada have been captured in video clips that are embedded throughout the web version of the book. At the end of each chapter, the Summary section includes additional features: Key Terms, Short Answer Exercises, and Suggested Readings. The key terms are bolded in the text, and collected in a Glossary in the appendix.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Open Textbooks
Date Added:
01/01/2016
How did we get here?
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This unit emphasizes the diaspora of human history.

 

Sixth graders are by nature a myopic people, and constantly in danger of not examining their own assumptions. Teaching large scale human history as a beginning to a closer study of culture, movement patterns and events allows students to understand the miraculous conditions that allowed humans to flourish. The perspective we take in this unit also challenges students to consider that the choices we make always provide a set of positive and negative consequences. In past pedagogy, the shift from hunting and gathering to agriculture was taught as the catalyst of human progress. While that is not entirely wrong, it limits students' thinking by not considering the things we lost with this "opportunity cost."

 

In keeping with the new geography-heavy 2015 standards, this unit begins with a role-playing simulation that asks students to learn specific biomes to imagine they are plopped down in a certain region of the world, with nothing but a basic tool kit (no clothing, food, or shelter!). Right away students understand the complexity of early survival and the interrelationship with the environment. Then, building on the interpretive skills they learned in Unit one, student examine cave paintings to hypothesis lifestyle choices and necessities for early paleolithic peoples. Students recall the mapping skills learned in Unit One to get a visual perspective of the human diaspora in the next lesson, which maps the migration out of Africa, and sets the stage to understanding the next big topic: shifting from hunting and gathering to an agrarian way of life. But first, students will culminate their learning of early humans in an analysis of the issue of who gets the rights to study Kennewick man's remains.

 

**From the new AAPS 6th grade curriculum; written by Rachel Toon for ATLAS

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Michigan Virtual
Author:
Emily Zheutlin
Date Added:
10/11/2017
Unit 1: Foundations for Early World History
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HISTORY H1 THE WORLD IN TEMPORAL TERMS: HISTORICAL HABITS OF MIND Evaluate evidence, compare and contrast information, interpret the historical record, and develop sound historical arguments and perspectives on which informed decisions in contemporary life can be based.

Compelling Questions:

How does historical thinking help us understand our world?

 

Chapter Supporting Questions:


How do we learn about the past?


Does thinking about the world with historical habits of mind help to make a better world?


How would you describe temporal thinking? Provide a scenario or specific event to illustrate.


What steps and tools do historians use to do their job?


How do historians collect and analyze evidence?


How do historians use evidence to construct theories, perspectives and hypotheses  (claims), and accounts about the past?


How and why are these historical claims controversial?

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Michigan Virtual
Author:
Amy Striegle
Date Added:
06/30/2016
Was the Spartan Education System Beneficial?
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This unit follows a general introduction of Athens and Sparta including historical context, geographical location, demographics, etc. This unit will begin with teaching about the people of Athens and Sparta and the competition between the two. Students will learn about the Persian Wars and the Peloponnesian Wars, focusing on the involvement of Athens and Sparta. Students will read articles describing the two city-states and the spartan education system in an open textbook. Based on their knowledge of both Sparta's and Athens' societal and military ventures, students will decide if the spartan education system was beneficial. They will then compose a persuasive essay on this topic.

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Michigan Virtual
Author:
Rebecca Fazio
Date Added:
07/24/2017
World Geography
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The 6th grade MI Open Book Geography Text explores the five themes of geography, first by providing an introduction to the study of geography itself, then focusing in on a theme each chapter while studying a region of the world. The final chapters explore the themes in action in other regions.

Subject:
World History
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
MIOpenBook
Provider Set:
Michigan Open Book Project
Author:
Dufort, Brian
Erickson, Sally
Hamilton, Matt
Soderquist, David
Zigray, Steve
Date Added:
08/15/2015
World History
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Using an inquiry based approach, Michigan high school students learn about World History from the fifth Era through today.

Subject:
World History
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
MIOpenBook
Provider Set:
Michigan Open Book Project
Author:
Bush, Rebecca
Camling, Stefanie
Halliwill, Mike
Kilgus, Troy
Koschmider, Anne
Lincoln, Adam
Pontoni, Mark
Salciccoli, Anthony
Stoppa, Tom}Vartanian, Nick
Wozniak, Melissa
Wregglesworth, Kymberli
Date Added:
08/15/2017
World History, Chapter 1: Would the World Have Been Better Off Without the Mongols?
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During the thirteenth century, the Mongols built an empire from scratch through remarkable feats of organization, planning, endurance, courage, slaughter, destruction, and terror. The empire was ruled by a combination of exploitation and protection of those conquered. The Mongol peace-keeping and encouragement of long distance communications, resulted in the widespread exchange of ideas, goods, and techniques, as well as in the spread of disease.

Subject:
World History
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
MIOpenBook
Provider Set:
Michigan Open Book Project
Author:
Adam Lincoln
Anne Koschnider
Anthony Salcicolli
Kymberli Wregglesworth
Mark Pontoni
Melissa Wozniak
Mike Halliwill
Nick Vartanian
Rebecca Bush
Stefanie Camling
Tom Stoppa
Troy Kilgas
Date Added:
12/15/2017
World History, Chapter 2: How Was the World Altered When the Four World Zones Connected?
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Today we live in a world that is extremely and irreversibly global. Our marketplaces offer seemingly limitless products from around the world. People utilize the Internet in order to connect to a body of collective learning previously unseen in history. This is in stark contrast to the origin of small hunting and gathering bands of Homo sapiens on the plains of East Africa. that existed close to 200,000 years ago. From these origins, Homo sapiens gradually migrated throughout the world. This lengthy journey culminated 14,000 years ago, with the human colonization of the last region of the earth, the Southern Cone of Argentina. At the end of this lengthy process of migration, the earth was divided into four distinct areas called world zones.

Subject:
World History
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
MIOpenBook
Provider Set:
Michigan Open Book Project
Author:
Adam Lincoln
Anne Koschnider
Anthony Salcicolli
Kymberli Wregglesworth
Mark Pontoni
Melissa Wozniak
Mike Halliwill
Nick Vartanian
Rebecca Bush
Stefanie Camling
Tom Stoppa
Troy Kilgas
Date Added:
12/15/2017
World History, Chapter 3: Did the Benefits of Exploration Outweight the Costs?
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The Crusades began in 1096 and lasted until 1291. During two centuries of atrocious fighting between Christians and Muslims to control the Holy Land, the end result was the establishment of a bitter hatred between the two religions. From an exploration standpoint, however, the result was not as dismal. Crusading in the areas of northern and eastern Europe led to the expansion of some kingdoms and the creation of new political units. While religious fighting was occurring, traders moved into the area and started to profit economically from use of the land. When the Catholic Crusaders returned from the Middle East in the 12th and 13th Centuries, they brought back with them tales of new lands and peoples as well as cloth such as silk and foods such as sugar—all of which they had never experienced before.

Subject:
World History
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
MIOpenBook
Provider Set:
Michigan Open Book Project
Author:
Adam Lincoln
Anne Koschnider
Anthony Salcicolli
Kymberli Wregglesworth
Mark Pontoni
Melissa Wozniak
Mike Halliwill
Nick Vartanian
Rebecca Bush
Stefanie Camling
Tom Stoppa
Troy Kilgas
Date Added:
12/15/2017
World History, Chapter 4: How Did the Slave Trade Impact the World?
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Questions raised in this chapter: Why were African slaves used primarily for forced labor in the cotton and sugar plantations in the Americas? (Instead of indentured servants and or Native Americans) 2. Why was the Trans-Atlantic slave trade transformative to the economic way of life in the Americas? 3. How did African slavery in the New World differ fundamentally from past instances of slavery and other systems of labor in the same era? 4. How did the geography of the region dictate the role of slaves?

Subject:
World History
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
MIOpenBook
Provider Set:
Michigan Open Book Project
Author:
Adam Lincoln
Anne Koschnider
Anthony Salcicolli
Kymberli Wregglesworth
Mark Pontoni
Melissa Wozniak
Mike Halliwill
Nick Vartanian
Rebecca Bush
Stefanie Camling
Tom Stoppa
Troy Kilgas
Date Added:
12/15/2017
World History, Chapter 5: To What Extent is Violence Necessary to Bring About Change
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Drawing and quartering, burning at the stake, tar and feathering, the pillory, the wooden wheel, the rack - all were devices or methods used for torturing humans conjured up over the ages. But in 18th Century Europe, a new movement, a new set of ideas was sweeping through the continent. A new type of thought, of “enlightenment,” was engaging the philosophes -- French philosophers or thinkers. These thinkers applied methods of science to understand society and to make improvements in it. With the application of reason, the philosophes believed government, law, and society could be reformed. According to the philosophes, the role of punishment and torture should be questioned too.

Subject:
World History
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
MIOpenBook
Provider Set:
Michigan Open Book Project
Author:
Adam Lincoln
Anne Koschnider
Anthony Salcicolli
Kymberli Wregglesworth
Mark Pontoni
Melissa Wozniak
Mike Halliwill
Nick Vartanian
Rebecca Bush
Stefanie Camling
Tom Stoppa
Troy Kilgas
Date Added:
12/15/2017
World History, Chapter 6: Was the Industrial Revolution Worth the Human Cost?
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The Industrial Revolution (ca. 1750-1900) may have involved fewer beheadings per capita than preceding political revolutions, but it was certainly transformative for people in all walks of life. In Europe, feudalism was a thing of the past, but without modern forms of transportation, the average person still had to rely on their local community for the production of food and durable goods. Prior to industrialization, most people lived as farmers; life revolved around subsistence agriculture. People worked the land with simple, homemade tools to grow their own food. Production of goods (clothing, for example) happened on a small scale, often within workers’ homes. Trade happened on a small scale within communities. Life expectancy was short, although it had increased at a slow rate since the Middle Ages. All of this, however, would change dramatically as the Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain and caused sweeping changes around the world. This global event transformed how people worked, played, traded and traveled. It changed politics, economics, and family structures and continues to shape our world today.

Subject:
World History
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
MIOpenBook
Provider Set:
Michigan Open Book Project
Author:
Adam Lincoln
Anne Koschnider
Anthony Salcicolli
Kymberli Wregglesworth
Mark Pontoni
Melissa Wozniak
Mike Halliwill
Nick Vartanian
Rebecca Bush
Stefanie Camling
Tom Stoppa
Troy Kilgas
Date Added:
12/15/2017
World Religions
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This unit is designed to provide 11th grade students with a basic understanding of the 5 Major World Religions.  Included for each religion are:  origins, development, beliefs, and impact.  The unit incorporates elements of online learning with face-to-face interactions.

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Michigan Virtual
Author:
Alexa Spruit
Date Added:
06/30/2016