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  • Abstraction
Abstraction
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Computational thinking assists students to break down problems into smaller parts so that it is easier to understand and solve them. Abstraction is pulling out specific differences to make one solution work for multiple problems.

Subject:
Educational Technology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Game
Interactive
Module
Provider:
REMC Association of Michigan
Author:
REMC Association of Michigan
Date Added:
03/12/2019
Advanced System Architecture, Spring 2006
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This course provides a deep understanding of engineering systems at a level intended for research on complex engineering systems. It provides a review and extension of what is known about system architecture and complexity from a theoretical point of view while examining the origins of and recent developments in the field. The class considers how and where the theory has been applied, and uses key analytical methods proposed. Students examine the level of observational (qualitative and quantitative) understanding necessary for successful use of the theoretical framework for a specific engineering system. Case studies apply the theory and principles to engineering systems.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Management
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Magee, Christopher
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Computational Thinking Concepts Guide from Google
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In this guide you will find eleven terms and definitions for Computational Thinking (CT) concepts. These concepts can be incorporated into existing lesson plans, projects, and demonstrations in order to infuse CT into any disciplinary subject.

The original copy of this information was created by Google and shared at https://docs.google.com/document/d/1i0wg-BMG3TdwsShAyH_0Z1xpFnpVcMvpYJceHGWex_c/edit. The only change made has been the format of the document. All information is exactly the same.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Computer Science
Engineering
Information Science
Mathematics
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Gina Loveless
Date Added:
08/28/2020
Grade 2 Module 3: Place Value, Counting, and Comparison of Numbers to 1,000
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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In this 25-day Grade 2 module, students expand their skill with and understanding of units by bundling ones, tens, and hundreds up to a thousand with straws. Unlike the length of 10 centimeters in Module 2, these bundles are discrete sets. One unit can be grabbed and counted just like a banana?1 hundred, 2 hundred, 3 hundred, etc. A number in Grade 1 generally consisted of two different units, tens and ones. Now, in Grade 2, a number generally consists of three units: hundreds, tens, and ones. The bundled units are organized by separating them largest to smallest, ordered from left to right. Over the course of the module, instruction moves from physical bundles that show the proportionality of the units to non-proportional place value disks and to numerals on the place value chart.

Subject:
Numbers and Operations
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
11/25/2012
Introduction to C Memory Management and C++ Object-Oriented Programming, January IAP 2010
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

" Ever hang your head in shame after your Python program wasn't as fast as your friend's C program? Ever wish you could use objects without having to use Java? Join us for this fun introduction to C and C++! We will take you through a tour that will start with writing simple C programs, go deep into the caves of C memory manipulation, resurface with an introduction to using C++ classes, dive deeper into advanced C++ class use and the C++ Standard Template Libraries. We'll wrap up by teaching you some tricks of the trade that you may need for tech interviews. We see this as a "C/C++ empowerment" course: we want you to come away understanding why you would want to use C over another language (control over memory, probably for performance reasons), why you would want to use C++ rather than C (objects), and how to be useful in C and C++. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month."

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kang, Eunsuk
Yang, Jean
Date Added:
01/01/2010
UMCDC 2nd grade Engage NY Math Module 4 -Topic D (20-21)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In Lesson 17 of Topic D, students extend the base ten understanding developed in Topic A to numbers within 200. Having worked with manipulatives to compose 10 ones as 1 ten, students relate this to composing 10 tens as 1 hundred. For example, students might solve 50 + 80 by thinking 5 ones + 8 ones = 13 ones, so 5 tens + 8 tens = 13 tens = 130. They use place value language to explain when they make a new hundred. They also relate 100 more from Module 3 to + 100 and mentally add 100 to given numbers. In Lesson 18, students use number disks on a place value chart to represent additions with the composition of 1 ten and 1 hundred. They use place value language to explain when they make a new ten and a new hundred, as well as where to show each new unit on the place value chart. In Lesson 19, students relate manipulatives to a written method, recording compositions as new groups below in vertical form. As they did in Topic B, students use place value language to express the action as they physically make 1 hundred with 10 tens disks and 1 ten with 10 ones disks. Working in partners, one student records each change in the written method step by step as the other partner moves the manipulatives. In Lessons 20 and 21, students move from concrete to pictorial as they use math drawings to represent compositions of 1 ten and 1 hundred. Some students may need the continued support of place value drawings with labeled disks, while others use the chip model. In both cases, students relate their drawings to a written method, recording each change they make to their model on the numerical representation. They use place value language to explain these changes. Lesson 22 focuses on adding up to four two-digit addends with totals within 200. Students now have multiple strategies for composing and decomposing numbers, and they use properties of operations (i.e., the associative property) to add numbers in an order that is easiest to compute. For example, when solving 24 + 36 + 55, when adding the ones, a student may make a ten first with 4 and 6. Another student may decompose the 6 to make 3 fives (by adding 1 to the 4).

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Date Added:
06/14/2021