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  • MI.SOC.6-G5.1.1
American Southwest
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presents a travel itinerary of 58 historic places across Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico. It includes forts built to protect mail routes and settlers, missions and churches, prehistoric cliff dwellings, trading posts, petroglyphs (from the petrified forest), pit house villages, and Indian villages home to the Anasazi, Sinagua, Zuni, and other Native American tribes.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Provider Set:
National Register of Historic Places
Date Added:
02/25/2004
Are We Our Own Worst Enemy? #1 (Land Usage)
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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This lesson deals with human growth and our consumption of land resources. This lesson can be used in conjunction with other Are We Our Own Worst Enemy? lessons, although this should be first since it has the video of population growth. This lesson results from a collaboration between the Alabama State Department of Education and ASTA.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Alabama Learning Exchange
Date Added:
08/06/2020
Climate Change Lesson 11 : Water Balance and the Great Lakes
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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Climagraphs can tell us about the seasonal shifts in climate due to climate change. Changes in growing season and water balance in the Great Lakes region will have economic impacts.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
Michigan Geographic Alliance
Date Added:
08/28/2020
The Crash Scene
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In this lesson, students find their location on a map using Latitude and Longitudinal coordinates. They determine where they should go to be rescued and how best to get there.

Subject:
Engineering
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Detroit: A National Register of Historic Places Travel Itinerary
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exhibits residential, recreational, commercial, industrial, and religious locations to create an online tour of the city. The itinerary features 39 properties in the National Register of Historic Places. Through maps, descriptions, and photographs of places both famous and little-known, this guide explains why Detroit has long been more than just a Motor City.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Date Added:
07/18/2000
Early History of the California Coast
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is a travel itinerary that highlights 45 historic places that help tell the story of Spanish colonization of California. Learn about forts, churches, adobe houses, historic districts, and other places. Find out about the Presidio, which was established in 1769 as the base for Spain's colonization efforts and was the first permanent European settlement on the Pacific Coast.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Date Added:
07/27/2007
Examining Changes to the Environment Through Pictures and Data
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Students will examine how human actions and population changes can affect the environment. Students will examine a series of photographs that compare famous landmarks (Times Square, the Saltair Pavilion in Utah, Laguna Beach, and Niagara Falls) across time, and then they will identify human-generated changes in the physical environment, such as the addition of bridges and roads. Students will also examine U.S. Census Bureau population and housing data to see how population changes can contribute to changes in the physical environment. In addition, students will describe the impact of these changes on the environment.

Subject:
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
U.S. Census Bureau
Provider Set:
Statistics in Schools
Date Added:
11/15/2019
Getting To Know Your Neighbor
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To introduce demographic characteristics to students, teachers will help them create a population pyramid. Then, students will use an online tool called QuickFacts to find census data on demographic characteristics for a county in 2017. They will compare it to older data from the same county to find changes and trends over time. They will then use QuickFacts to examine data about their school’s county. Students will use this information to help them understand how business owners and community leaders use data on demographic characteristics to make decisions.

Subject:
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
U.S. Census Bureau
Provider Set:
Statistics in Schools
Date Added:
11/15/2019
How did we get here?
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This unit emphasizes the diaspora of human history.

 

Sixth graders are by nature a myopic people, and constantly in danger of not examining their own assumptions. Teaching large scale human history as a beginning to a closer study of culture, movement patterns and events allows students to understand the miraculous conditions that allowed humans to flourish. The perspective we take in this unit also challenges students to consider that the choices we make always provide a set of positive and negative consequences. In past pedagogy, the shift from hunting and gathering to agriculture was taught as the catalyst of human progress. While that is not entirely wrong, it limits students' thinking by not considering the things we lost with this "opportunity cost."

 

In keeping with the new geography-heavy 2015 standards, this unit begins with a role-playing simulation that asks students to learn specific biomes to imagine they are plopped down in a certain region of the world, with nothing but a basic tool kit (no clothing, food, or shelter!). Right away students understand the complexity of early survival and the interrelationship with the environment. Then, building on the interpretive skills they learned in Unit one, student examine cave paintings to hypothesis lifestyle choices and necessities for early paleolithic peoples. Students recall the mapping skills learned in Unit One to get a visual perspective of the human diaspora in the next lesson, which maps the migration out of Africa, and sets the stage to understanding the next big topic: shifting from hunting and gathering to an agrarian way of life. But first, students will culminate their learning of early humans in an analysis of the issue of who gets the rights to study Kennewick man's remains.

 

**From the new AAPS 6th grade curriculum; written by Rachel Toon for ATLAS

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Michigan Virtual
Author:
Emily Zheutlin
Date Added:
10/11/2017
Investigating Local History
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This collection of free, authoritative source information about the history, politics, geography, and culture of many states and territories has been funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Our Teacher's Guide provides compelling questions, links to humanities organizations and local projects, and research activity ideas for integrating local history into humanities courses.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
History
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Date Added:
12/11/2019
Oil Spill
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This lesson will allow students to explore an important role of environmental engineers: cleaning the environment. Students will learn details about the Exxon Valdez oil spill, which was one of the most publicized and studied environmental tragedies in history. In the accompanying activity, they will try many "engineered" strategies to clean up their own manufactured oil spill and learn the difficulties of dealing with oil released into our waters.

Subject:
Engineering
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Janet Yowell
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Melissa Straten
Sharon D. Perez-Suarez
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Oso Mudslide - Before and After
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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In this lesson, students take on the role of a county official tasked with spreading awareness of the disaster. Using imagery of the affected area, they create a web mapping application that allows users to easily compare the area before and after the disaster. Users should also to be able to measure the extent of the impact. Lastly, the app should link to additional material about the landslide.

Subject:
Applied Science
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Michigan Virtual
Author:
GRACE Project
Date Added:
12/27/2016
Revitalizing Rochester: Illuminating Standards Video Series
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Sixth grade students from Rochester, NY transformed their own community by leading a successful campaign to revitalize the downtown of Rochester through re-watering closed sections of the Erie Canal. Students did original research in other cities, interviewing city leaders, engineers and business leaders who had successfully renewed their downtowns around a waterway. They created a report that helped convince the city to invest in this urban renewal project. This film features news footage of the students and an interview with the mayor.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
EL Education
Date Added:
07/03/2018
Save Our City!
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Educational Use
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Students learn about various natural hazards and specific methods engineers use to prevent these hazards from becoming natural disasters. They study a hypothetical map of an area covered with natural hazards and decide where to place natural disaster prevention devices by applying their critical thinking skills and an understanding of the causes of natural disasters.

Subject:
Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Denise Carlson
Geoffrey Hill
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Date Added:
09/26/2008
Splish, Splash, I was Takin' a Bath!
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In this lesson, students will explore the causes of water pollution and its effects on the environment through the use of models and scientific investigation. In the accompanying activities, they will investigate filtration and aeration processes as they are used for removing pollutants from water. Lastly, they will learn about the role of engineers in water treatment systems.

Subject:
Engineering
Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Amy Kolenbrander
Janet Yowell
Jessica Todd
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Traveling the National Road
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tells the story of the first road built with federal funds. Construction of the 632-mile road from Cumberland, Maryland, to Vandalia, Illinois, began in 1811. The aim was to improve trade between the east and the emerging western frontier and to avoid losing western trade to England in Canada or Spain in the Louisiana Territory. The website tells how the road was built, how people traveled on it, accommodations they found along the way, and more.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Date Added:
07/11/2003