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  • MITECS.A12-14.CT.4
21 Things 4 Students
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21Things4Students is an online resource to help students improve their technology proficiency as they prepare for success in the real world. Teachers value 21Things4Students because it's experiential, relevant, applicable and adaptable. Students say they love this class!

Subject:
Educational Technology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
REMC Association of Michigan
Provider Set:
21Things4Students
Author:
REMC Association of Michigan
Date Added:
12/06/2010
About Accuracy and Approximation
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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Students learn about the concepts of accuracy and approximation as they pertain to robotics, gain insight into experimental accuracy, and learn how and when to estimate values that they measure. Students also explore sources of error stemming from the robot setup and rounding numbers.

Subject:
Engineering
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Ronald Poveda
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Bringing Algorithms into the Classroom
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Students will take a sequence of events or steps for some process and create an algorithm. This could apply to any content area. They will display the algorithm in flowchart form. This activity can be modified for all grade levels and content areas.

Subject:
Computer Science
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Life Science
Mathematics
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Cheryl Wilson
Date Added:
08/28/2020
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.11: Booleans and Conditionals
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
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Students start by using booleans to compare the current value of a sprite property with a target value, using that comparison to determine when a sprite has reached a point on the screen, grown to a given size, or otherwise reached a value using the counter pattern. After using booleans directly to investigate the values or sprite properties, students add conditional _if_ statements to write code that responds to those boolean comparisons.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
12/11/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.13: Other Forms of Input
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CC BY-NC-SA
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In this lesson students continue to explore ways to use conditional statements to take user input. In addition to the simple `keyDown()` command learned yesterday, students will learn about several other keyboard input commands as well as ways to take mouse input.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
12/11/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.14: Project - Interactive Card
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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In this cumulative project for Chapter 1, students plan for and develop an interactive greeting card using all of the programming techniques they've learned to this point.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
12/11/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.16: Collision Detection
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Students learn about collision detection on the computer. Working in pairs, they explore how a computer could use sprite location and size properties and math to detect whether two sprites are touching. They then use the `isTouching()` block to create different effects when sprites collide, including playing sounds. Last, they use their new skills to improve the sidescroller game that they started in the last lesson.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
12/11/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.19: Functions
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Students learn how to create functions to organize their code, make it more readable, and remove repeated blocks of code. An unplugged warmup explores how directions at different levels of detail can be useful depending on context. Students learn that higher level or more abstract steps make it easier to understand and reason about steps. Afterwards students learn to create functions in Game Lab. They will use functions to remove long blocks of code from their draw loop and to replace repeated pieces of code with a single function. At the end of the lesson students use these skills to organize and add functionality to the final version of their side scroller game.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
12/11/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.1: Booleans Unplugged
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In this lesson, students are introduced to boolean values and logic, as well as conditional statements. The class starts by playing a simple game of Stand Up, Sit Down in which the boolean (true/false) statements describe personal properties (hair or eye color, clothing type, age, etc). This gets students thinking about how they can frame a property with multiple potential values (such as age) with a binary question.

From there students are provided a group of objects with similar, yet varying, physical properties. With a partner they group those objects based on increasingly complex boolean statements, including compound booleans with AND and OR.

Finally we reveal Conditionals as a tool to make decisions or impact the flow of a program using boolean statements as input.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
12/11/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.21: Using the Game Design Process
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CC BY-NC-SA
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In this multi-day lesson, students use the problem solving process from Unit 1 to create a platform jumper game. They start by looking at an example of a platform jumper, then define what their games will look like. Next, they use a structured process to plan the backgrounds, variables, sprites, and functions they will need to implement their game. After writing the code for the game, students will reflect on how the game could be improved, and implement those changes.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
12/11/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.2: The Game Design Process
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This lesson introduces students to the process they will use to design games for the remainder of the unit. This process is centered around a project guide which asks students to define their sprites, variables, and functions before they begin programming their game. In this lesson students begin by playing a game on Game Lab where the code is hidden. They discuss what they think the sprites, variables, and functions would need to be to make the game. They are then given a completed project guide which shows one way to implement the game. Students are then walked through this process through a series of levels. As part of this lesson students also briefly learn to use multi-frame animations in Game Lab. At the end of the lesson students have an opportunity to make improvements to the game to make it their own.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
12/11/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.9: Sprite Movement
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CC BY-NC-SA
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By combining the Draw Loop and the Counter Pattern, students write programs that move sprites across the screen, as well as animate other sprite properties.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
12/11/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Physical Computing Lesson 6.4: Input Unplugged
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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In preparation for delving deeper into programming with App Lab, students will explore how a handful of different programs written in both Game Lab and App Lab handle taking input from the user. After comparing and contrasting the approaches they saw in the example apps, students group up to act out the two different models for input (conditionals in an infinite loop and asynchronous events) to gain a better understanding of how they work.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
12/11/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Physical Computing Lesson 6.6: Getting Properties
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This lesson introduces students to the `getProperty` block, which allows them to access the properties of different elements with code. Students first practice using the block to determine what the user has input in various user interface elements. Students later use `getProperty` and `setProperty` together with the counter pattern to make elements move across the screen. A new screen element, the slider, and a new event trigger, `onChange`, are also introduced.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
12/11/2019
Computational Thinker
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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A Google Slide Deck introduction to the MITECS competency Computational Thinker - Students develop and employ strategies for understanding and solving problems in ways that leverage the power of technological methods to develop and test solutions.

Example: In a high school physics class, students designed catapults that could hit measured distances at two different points. Prior to mapping designs, students used calculators and computer-based scenario software to practice and apply formulas based on data to test hypothesis. Once they had a working theory that the team agreed on, the students created prototypes for initial testing. They shared the recordings with scientists and engineers from the local university, who posted feedback on the comment feature of a video channel. Student teams used the feedback to make changes to their designs and built their miniature catapults. They then conducted their final tests.

Questions for Reflection:
- How do the MITECS compliment core content?
- How might you and your colleagues develop cross-curricular experiences to support the MITECS?
- Which of the competencies are you most familiar with?
- Which competency is an area of growth for you, as an educator?

Subject:
Educational Technology
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
REMC Association of Michigan
Date Added:
02/22/2019