Wayland Union Schools

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Unit 5.1 Go With the Flow

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Area: Earth Systems This Fifth Grade unit is the FIRST in the curriculum of four (4) units developed to address the Fifth Grade science standards of the Michigan Science Standards related to Earth Systems. You have just read the general description for this Phenomenal Science Unit. Before you continue your review, it would be very valuable to our field testing process for the 21 Units of Phenomenal Science for us to gather information about those educators who are reviewing each of the Units. Thank you. Please start your review with this BRIEF SURVEY. Enjoy your review.

Material Type: Unit of Study

Author: Phenomenal-Science

Unit 5.2 Ch-ch-Changes

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Area: Matter & Its Interactions This Fifth Grade unit is the second in the curriculum of four (4) units developed to address the Fifth Grade science standards of the Michigan Science Standards related to Matter and Its Interactions. You have just read the general description for this Phenomenal Science Unit. Before you continue your review, it would be very valuable to our field testing process for the 21 Units of Phenomenal Science for us to gather information about those educators who are reviewing each of the Units. Thank you. Please start your review with this BRIEF SURVEY(link is external). Enjoy your review. Matter is anything that takes up space and is made up of PARTICLES so tiny that only the most powerful microscope can see them.  Matter makes up everything seen and unseen, including clothes, water, food, plants, air, the smell of perfume, and animals.   You can describe a type of matter by its physical or chemical properties.  A physical property of matter is a property that can be observed or measured that does not change the substance.  Some examples are color, texture, hardness, reflectivity, and magnetism.  A chemical property of matter is a property that changes a substance's identity or creates a new substance.  Some examples are flammability (ability of a substance to burn), reactivity with acid, and rusting/oxidation.   The Law of Conservation of Matter states that matter cannot be created or destroyed but can change.  Substances can also exist as mixtures and solutions.  A mixture is a physical combination of two or more substances that can be easily separated.  Some examples are trail mix, salt and pepper, cereal and milk, and pizza.  A solution is a combination of two or more substances in which one substance is dissolved into another.  Somes examples of a solution are salt water, Kool Aid in water, and lemonade.  A physical change is a change in matter that does not change the identity of the substance.  Some examples would be an ice cube melting, broken crackers, demolition of a building, and getting a haircut.  A chemical change is a change in matter that does change the identity of a substance.  Some examples would be wood burning, a cake baking, a nail rusting, and the formation of concrete.

Material Type: Unit of Study

Author: Phenomenal-Science

Unit 5.3 To Infinity and Beyond

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Area: Earth and the Universe This Fifth Grade unit is the THIRD in the curriculum of four (4) units developed to address the Fifth Grade science standards of the Michigan Science Standards related to Earth and the Universe. You have just read the general description for this Phenomenal Science Unit. Before you continue your review, it would be very valuable to our field testing process for the 21 Units of Phenomenal Science for us to gather information about those educators who are reviewing each of the Units. Thank you. Please start your review with this BRIEF SURVEY. Enjoy your review.

Material Type: Unit of Study

Author: Phenomenal-Science

Unit 5.4 Round and Round It Goes

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Area: Matter, Energy, Ecosystems This Fifth Grade unit is the FOURTH in the curriculum of four (4) units developed to address the Fifth Grade science standards of the Michigan Science Standards related to Matter, Energy, Ecosystems. You have just read the general description for this Phenomenal Science Unit. Before you continue your review, it would be very valuable to our field testing process for the 21 Units of Phenomenal Science for us to gather information about those educators who are reviewing each of the Units. Thank you. Please start your review with this BRIEF SURVEY(link is external). Enjoy your review.

Material Type: Unit of Study

Author: Phenomenal-Science

Unit K.1 Living It Up

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This Kindergarten unit is the THIRD in the curriculum of three (3) units developed to address the Kindergarten science standards of the Michigan Science Standards related to Earth and Environment.

Material Type: Unit of Study

Unit K.1 Warm Up, Cool Down

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Area: Energy This Kindergarten unit is the FIRST in the curriculum of three (3) units developed to address the Kindergarten science standards of the Michigan Science Standards related to Energy. You have just read the general description for this Phenomenal Science Unit. Before you continue your review, it would be very valuable to our field testing process for the 21 Units of Phenomenal Science for us to gather information about those educators who are reviewing each of the Units. Thank you. Please start your review with this BRIEF SURVEY. Enjoy your review.

Material Type: Unit of Study

Author: Phenomenal-Science

Unit K.2 Barrier's Up!

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Area: Force and Motion This Kindergarten unit is the SECOND in the curriculum of three (3) units developed to address the Kindergarten science standards of the Michigan Science Standards related to Force and Motion. You have just read the general description for this Phenomenal Science Unit. Before you continue your review, it would be very valuable to our field testing process for the 21 Units of Phenomenal Science for us to gather information about those educators who are reviewing each of the Units. Thank you. Please start your review with this BRIEF SURVEY. Enjoy your review. A force must act upon an object in order for motion to occur. The movement of objects is determined by a push or a pull. Pushing moves something in the direction of the push. When more force is applied to a stationary object, more movement will be observed. When less force is applied to the same object, less movement will be observed. The harder the push on a stationary object, the further the item goes. Pulling something has a similar action. The harder you pull on a stationary object, the faster something moves along.  Anything with mass slows down because of that weight. This is inertia. The larger something's mass is, the more inertia it has and the more force you need to make it move. (A beach ball might be larger than a bowling ball but the bowling ball has more mass.) Students will explore what they know about position, by asking and answering questions about their own position in relation to other people and objects.  Students observe how things move around the school €“ how they move, and how fast they move.  Students will consider their daily activities and the motions that accompany them.  Students begin to describe motion by collaborating with peers to conduct investigations that explore moving objects and acting out different motions.  Students understand that they, too, are in motion and exert forces.  Students analyze and interpret information while observing objects in motion, classify them by speed, and recognize that speed can change, in order to answer the question, how fast does it go? Their knowledge of speed expands as they plan and conduct investigations with several objects moving at different speeds. They begin thinking about the concept of speed changing, such as slowing down and speeding up.  Students use ramps and objects such as toy cars, marbles, etc. to understand that objects move at different speeds and change speed, while exploring cause and effect.  Students are introduced to the concept of force as a push or pull.  They work cooperatively to make a variety of objects move and begin to recognize that it takes a push or a pull to make an object move.  Students will classify forces they use every day as pushes or pulls.  Students then begin modeling cause and effect by showing how changing the force exerted on an object can change its speed.  Students plan and conduct investigations using ramps resting on stacks of one, two, and three books.  They predict and measure the effects of changing the height of the book stacks.  They also push the cars with their hands on a flat surface to achieve different speeds.  Once they understand the cause and effect of force on speed, students work collaboratively to explore how they can use forces to change the speed of and stop moving objects.  Students expand on the concept that forces have strength and direction.

Material Type: Unit of Study

Author: Phenomenal-Science