#GoOpen Michigan Collaboration

This is a group for statewide collaboration to support teachers and students with the creation and use of OER in teaching and learning.
50 members | 104 affiliated resources

All resources in #GoOpen Michigan Collaboration

39a. Education

(View Complete Item Description)

Demands for better public education were many. Employers wanted a better educated workforce, at least for the technical jobs. Classical liberals believed that public education was the cornerstone of any democracy. Our system of government could be imperiled if large numbers of uneducated masses voted unwisely.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading

3a. Life along the Nile

(View Complete Item Description)

None of the achievements of the remarkable ancient Egyptian civilization would have been possible without the Nile River. There is always a connection between landscape and how a people develop. It does not take the wisdom of a sphinx to understand why.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading

3b. Egyptian Social Structure

(View Complete Item Description)

Egyptian society was structured like a pyramid. At the top were the gods, such as Ra, Osiris, and Isis. Egyptians believed that the gods controlled the universe. Therefore, it was important to keep them happy. They could make the Nile overflow, cause famine, or even bring death.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading

4a. Life in Sumer

(View Complete Item Description)

Located in what the ancient Greeks called Mesopotamia, which literally means "the land between the rivers," Sumer was a collection of city-states that occupied the southernmost portion of Mesopotamia. Most were situated along the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers, lying just north of the Persian Gulf.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading

4b. Babylonia

(View Complete Item Description)

The Babylonians used the innovations of the Sumerians, added to them, and built an empire that gave the world, among other things, codified laws, a tower that soared above the earth, and one of the Seven Wonders of the World.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading

4e. Persian Empire

(View Complete Item Description)

Rather than destroy local economies for their own selfish gain, the Persians worked to increase trade throughout their kingdom. They standardized weights, developed official coinage, and implemented universal laws.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading

4f. Phoenicians: Sailing Away

(View Complete Item Description)

The Phoenicians lived along the Mediterranean coast in what is now Lebanon. They inhabited a number of different city-states, the most famous of which were Tyre, Byblos, and Sidon. These Phoenician places were often in conflict with each other for domination of the region. Because of this lack of cooperation, the Phoenicians were conquered and forced to pay tribute to the virtually every empire in the region, including the Egyptians, Hittites, Assyrians, Babylonians, Persians, and Greeks.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading

4g. Hebrews and the Land of Milk and Honey

(View Complete Item Description)

The Hebrew's early contribution to humankind was not wealthy empires or groundbreaking technology. Rather, it was the revolutionary idea that there was only one god, a belief known as monotheism. This one Hebrew god was called Yahweh. To the Hebrews, Yahweh was all powerful and all knowing, yet beyond human understanding. The religion based around this god influenced the founding of Christianity and Islam.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading

7e. Life on the Desert

(View Complete Item Description)

Traditional Bedouin are pastoral nomads, or wanderers who travel with herds of domesticated animals. They are constantly on the move, with no permanent camping place. Their staple belongings include camels and tents, and they frown upon agriculture and all types of trades and crafts. Any type of settled life is traditionally considered beneath Bedouin dignity.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading

8a. Early Civilization in the Indus Valley

(View Complete Item Description)

Although the intricate details of the early Indus Valley culture might never be fully known, many pieces of the ancient puzzle have been discovered. The remains of the Indus Valley cities continue to be unearthed and interpreted today. With each new artifact, the history of early Indian civilization is strengthened and the legacy of this ingenious and diverse metropolis is made richer.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading

8e. The Gupta Period of India

(View Complete Item Description)

The Gupta Period of India was not characterized by enormous material wealth or by elaborate trade activity. It was defined by creativity. Flourishing arts, fabulous literature, and stupendous scholars are just a few of the things that marked the period.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading

The Aztecs: Mighty Warriors of Mexico

(View Complete Item Description)

The Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan was the hub of a rich civilization that dominated the region of modern-day Mexico at the time the Spanish forces arrived. In this lesson, students will learn about the history and culture of the Aztecs and discover why their civilization came to an abrupt end.

Material Type: Lesson Plan

10c. Feudal Japan: The Age of the Warrior

(View Complete Item Description)

Being a warrior in feudal Japan was more than just a job. It was a way of life. The collapse of aristocratic rule ushered in a new age of chaos — appropriately called the Warring States period (c.1400-1600) — in which military might dictated who governed and who followed.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading

11. Central and South American Empires

(View Complete Item Description)

In the 1500s, when Spanish conquistadors appeared, two vast empires, those of the Aztecs and the Incas, dominated Central and South America. Both possessed divine kings, both were fractured by internal dissent, and both quickly succumbed to the Spanish onslaught. The physical remains of all these cultures lay dormant for centuries, until science and curiosity demanded their exploration.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading

11a. Blood of Kings: The World of the Maya

(View Complete Item Description)

The Maya were a collection of people clustered in city-states. What united them was an idea. For the Maya the world of ordinary living and the Otherworld populated by gods, ancestors, and monstrous things, were equally real. There existed three regions, intricately bound together: the heavens, the earth, and the waters of the Underworld.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading

11d. The Aztec World

(View Complete Item Description)

Huitzilopochtl, God of the Sun, was the Aztec principal god. He had an insatiable appetite for blood. Under his urging, the Aztecs rose from a band of primitive farmers to become the bloodiest civilization of the early Americas. Many Central America cultures indulged in human sacrifice. The Aztec practiced it on an industrial scale, sacrificing tens of thousands of victims each year.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading