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Advanced Algorithms, Fall 2008
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" This is a graduate course on the design and analysis of algorithms, covering several advanced topics not studied in typical introductory courses on algorithms. It is especially designed for doctoral students interested in theoretical computer science."

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Goemans, Michel
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Advanced Circuit Techniques, Spring 2002
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Following a brief classroom discussion of relevant principles, each student completes the paper design of several advanced circuits such as multiplexers, sample-and-holds, gain-controlled amplifiers, analog multipliers, digital-to-analog or analog-to-digital converters, and power amplifiers. One of each student's designs is presented to the class, and one may be built and evaluated. Associated laboratory emphasizing the use of modern analog building blocks. Alternate years.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Roberge, Jim
Date Added:
01/01/2002
Advanced Topics in Cryptography, Spring 2003
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Recent results in cryptography and interactive proofs. Lectures by instructor, invited speakers, and students. Alternate years. The topics covered in this course include interactive proofs, zero-knowledge proofs, zero-knowledge proofs of knowledge, non-interactive zero-knowledge proofs, secure protocols, two-party secure computation, multiparty secure computation, and chosen-ciphertext security.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Micali, Silvio
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Adventures in Advanced Symbolic Programming, Spring 2009
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" This course covers concepts and techniques for the design and implementation of large software systems that can be adapted to uses not anticipated by the designer. Applications include compilers, computer-algebra systems, deductive systems, and some artificial intelligence applications. Topics include combinators, generic operations, pattern matching, pattern-directed invocation, rule systems, backtracking, dependencies, indeterminacy, memoization, constraint propagation, and incremental refinement. Substantial weekly programming Assignments and Labs are an integral part of the subject. There will be extensive programming Assignments and Labs, using MIT/GNU Scheme. Students should have significant programming experience in Scheme, Common Lisp, Haskell, CAML or some other "functional" language."

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Sussman, Gerald
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Algorithms for Computer Animation, Fall 2002
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In-depth study of an active research topic in computer graphics. Topics change each term. Readings from the literature, student presentations, short assignments, and a programming project. Animation is a compelling and effective form of expression; it engages viewers and makes difficult concepts easier to grasp. Today's animation industry creates films, special effects, and games with stunning visual detail and quality. This graduate class will investigate the algorithms that make these animations possible: keyframing, inverse kinematics, physical simulation, optimization, optimal control, motion capture, and data-driven methods. Our study will also reveal the shortcomings of these sophisticated tools. The students will propose improvements and explore new methods for computer animation in semester-long research projects. The course should appeal to both students with general interest in computer graphics and students interested in new applications of machine learning, robotics, biomechanics, physics, applied mathematics and scientific computing.

Subject:
Computer Science
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Popovic, Jovan
Date Added:
01/01/2002
Ambient Intelligence, Spring 2005
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This course will provide an overview of a new vision for Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) in which people are surrounded by intelligent and intuitive interfaces embedded in the everyday objects around them. It will focus on understanding enabling technologies and studying applications and experiments, and, to a lesser extent, it will address the socio-cultural impact. Students will read and discuss the most relevant articles in related areas: smart environments, smart networked objects, augmented and mixed realities, ubiquitous computing, pervasive computing, tangible computing, intelligent interfaces and wearable computing. Finally, they will be asked to come up with new ideas and start innovative projects in this area.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Maes, Patricia
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Animated Division Stories (Problem-Based Interactive Learning)
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Students will work with a partner to write, solve, check, and animate a division story problem based on a division expression using a sharing model.

Subject:
Computer Science
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Speaking and Listening
Mathematics
Numbers and Operations
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Jody Walker
Date Added:
03/24/2019
App Inventor Maker Cards
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This set of cards can be used in a workshop or a "Maker Faire" type of event. They give quick tidbits of code for building mini-apps with App Inventor. Use them in exhibits, parent nights, STEM fairs, after-school clubs, or anywhere that you need to get people jump-started using App Inventor.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
MIT
Date Added:
04/10/2020
Artificial Intelligence, Fall 2010
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This course introduces students to the basic knowledge representation, problem solving, and learning methods of artificial intelligence. Upon completion of 6.034, students should be able to develop intelligent systems by assembling solutions to concrete computational problems, understand the role of knowledge representation, problem solving, and learning in intelligent-system engineering, and appreciate the role of problem solving, vision, and language in understanding human intelligence from a computational perspective.

Subject:
Computer Science
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Winston, Patrick Henry
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Automata, Computability, and Complexity, Spring 2011
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This course provides a challenging introduction to some of the central ideas of theoretical computer science. Beginning in antiquity, the course will progress through finite automata, circuits and decision trees, Turing machines and computability, efficient algorithms and reducibility, the P versus NP problem, NP-completeness, the power of randomness, cryptography and one-way functions, computational learning theory, and quantum computing. It examines the classes of problems that can and cannot be solved by various kinds of machines. It tries to explain the key differences between computational models that affect their power.

Subject:
Computer Science
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Aaronson, Scott
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Automatic Speech Recognition, Spring 2003
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Graduate-level introduction to automatic speech recognition. Provides relevant background in acoustic theory of speech production, properties of speech sounds, signal representation, acoustic modeling, pattern classification, search algorithms, stochastic modeling techniques (including hidden Markov modeling), and language modeling. Examines approaches of state-of-the-art speech recognition systems. Introduces students to the rapidly developing field of automatic speech recognition. Its content is divided into three parts. Part I deals with background material in the acoustic theory of speech production, acoustic-phonetics, and signal representation. Part II describes algorithmic aspects of speech recognition systems including pattern classification, search algorithms, stochastic modelling, and language modelling techniques. Part III compares and contrasts the various approaches to speech recognition, and describes advanced techniques used for acoustic-phonetic modelling, robust speech recognition, speaker adaptation, processing paralinguistic information, speech understanding, and multimodal processing.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Glass, James Robert
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Beats Empire
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The PFACS game engages students in playing the role of a music producer who must use data and computational thinking to promote their artist’s careers. “Data and Analysis” is one of five strands in the CS K-12 Framework — and it is a strand that readily bridges to mathematics and science content that you already teach. By giving students time to play the game and then having related classroom discussions, you can gain insight into your students’ progress in understanding these concepts.

This game does NOT require any coding skills nor knowledge of any programming language. It is about making choices using computational thinking concepts, not about writing code.

Beats Empire was designed for teachers:

In middle schools classrooms
That integrate data science, computational thinking and related concepts
For about an hour of use spread over 2-3 class periods
Where students have access to any computer, laptop or desktop, with Chrome or Firefox browser (not recommended for tablets or phones).
The key goals of Beats Empire are:

Students explore how their data skills addresses a real world challenge
Students gain career awareness of attractive data science jobs
Teachers increase their understanding of what students know and can do

Subject:
Applied Science
Computer Science
Mathematics
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Beats Empire
Date Added:
04/21/2020