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Contemporary Literature
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The goal of this class is to provide readers with exposure to a variety of modern literature. In this course, you will be able to choose three genres of contemporary literature to explore. All assignments must reflect critical thinking based on the standards linked to the units. Each until will be introduced with a mini-research project. Your reading progress will be documented on your blog. A final book review will be written and posted on your GoodReads account.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Michigan Virtual
Author:
Elizabeth Buckhold
Date Added:
02/21/2015
Cultural Representation in the Media
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 Advertisements can present a biased cultural representation that can affect our perceptions of others.  For example, a television show may show commercials with some groups of people more than others. A magazine may have advertisements and articles representing a certain type of people in a way that reinforces stereotypes.  Students need to be taught to recognize the culture that is being represented in the media they consume as well as the cultures that are absent from the same media.This is Part 5 of a 5 Part Unit: Media Manipulation: What Are They Really Saying?

Subject:
Information Science
Visual Arts
World Cultures
Marketing
Electronic Technology
Film and Music Production
English Language Arts
Cultural Geography
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Patricia Denton
Date Added:
08/05/2019
Learning by Comparison: First World/Third World Cities, Fall 2008
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" The primary purpose of this seminar is to enable students to craft approaches to so-called "First World"/ "Third World" city comparisons that are theoretically sophisticated, methodologically rigorous, contextually grounded, and significantly beneficial. Since there exists very little literature and very few projects which compare "First World" and "Third World" cities in a sophisticated and genuinely useful manner, the seminar is structured around a series of readings, case studies, and discussions to assist students in becoming mindful of the potential and pitfalls of comparative analysis, the types of data, the methods of analysis, and the urban issues or sectors which may benefit the most from such approaches. The course is designed to be interdisciplinary and interactive, and is geared towards masters and doctoral students."

Subject:
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Inam, Aseem
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Writing About Race: Narratives of Multiraciality, Fall 2008
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" In this course we will read essays, novels, memoirs, and graphic texts, and view documentary and experimental films and videos which explore race from the standpoint of the multiracial. Examining the varied work of multiracial authors and filmmakers such as Danzy Senna, Ruth Ozeki, Kip Fulbeck, James McBride and others, we will focus not on how multiracial people are seen or imagined by the dominant culture, but instead on how they represent themselves. How do these authors approach issues of family, community, nation, language and history? What can their work tell us about the complex interconnections between race, gender, class, sexuality, and citizenship? Is there a relationship between their experiences of multiraciality and a willingness to experiment with form and genre? In addressing these and other questions, we will endeavor to think and write more critically and creatively about race as a social category and a lived experience."

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Film and Music Production
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ragusa, Kym L.
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Writing About Race, Spring 2013
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Does race still matter, as Cornel West proclaimed in his 1994 book of that title, or do we now live, as others maintain, in a post-racial society? The very notion of what constitutes race remains a complex and evolving question in cultural terms. In this course we will engage this question head-on, reading and writing about issues involving the construction of race and racial identity as reflected from a number of vantage points and via a rich array of voices and genres. Readings will include literary works by such writers as Toni Morrison, Junot Diaz, and Sherman Alexie, as well as perspectives on film and popular culture from figures such as Malcolm Gladwell and Touré.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Faery, Rebecca Blevins
Date Added:
01/01/2007