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10th Grade ELA: Information Fluency
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In this unit, students will understand where “fake news” comes from, why it exists and how they can think like fact checkers to become fluent consumers, evaluators, and creators of information. They will apply this knowledge by selecting a controversial topic to evaluate, synthesize, and analyze all aspects before sharing with a local audience.

Subject:
Journalism
Education
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Beth Kabes
Crystal Hurt
Date Added:
08/13/2020
1897 Petition Against the Annexation of Hawaii
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This site recounts the struggle for control of Hawaii between native Hawaiians and American business interests in the late 1800s. This 1897 petition and a lobbying effort by native Hawaiians convinced the U.S. Congress not to annex the islands. But months later the U.S.S. Maine exploded in Havana and the Spanish-American War began. The U.S. needed a mid-Pacific fueling station and naval base.

Primary source images, standards correlation, and teaching activities are included in this resource.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Archives and Records Administration
Date Added:
08/24/2007
1st Grade Math Lesson
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Overview: In this lesson, students will particpate in three separate learning activities. These activities are each made to help improve the students' knowledge of creating real-world problems to represent an addition and a subraction equation within 20. At the end of the lesson, there is an assessment in order to check the effectivenss of the learning activities

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
Sophie Keller
Date Added:
08/03/2020
2D Representations of 3D Objects
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This lesson unit is intended to help teachers assess how well students are able to visualize two-dimensional cross-sections of representations of three-dimensional objects. In particular, the lesson will help you identify and help students who have difficulties recognizing and drawing two-dimensional cross-sections at different points along a plane of a representation of a three-dimensional object.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
08/05/2020
2D Representations of 3D Objects
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This lesson unit is intended to help teachers assess how well students are able to visualize two-dimensional cross-sections of representations of three-dimensional objects. In particular, the lesson will help you identify and help students who have difficulties recognizing and drawing two-dimensional cross-sections at different points along a plane of a representation of a three-dimensional object.

Subject:
Mathematics
Geometry
Material Type:
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Author:
Haley Dotson
Date Added:
08/03/2020
2nd Grade: Learning to Count Change Lesson Plan and PowerPoint
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Lesson Plan – Math Lesson Plan: Learning to Count Change 2nd grade Activity: Learning to count change: penny, nickel, dime, quarter Grade: 2nd grade Concepts: Teach the students how to recognize change and count using pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters up to a dollar. National Standards: Math- MA 2.2.5.a. Count mixed coins to $1.00 Objectives: the objective is that the students learn how to recognize and distinguish between different American currency using change: pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters. Criteria: The student must be able to provide evidence and knowledge of the behavior and the student is expected to learn how to count change (penny, nickel, dime, quarter) up to a dollar will a high accuracy. Multiple Intelligences: The lesson accounts for auditory, visual, and kinetic learners by having the students participate in many different strategic learning activities. Essential Question(s):1.    How can learning to count change help you inside the classroom as well as outside   the classroom?2.    Why is learning to count change important?3.    How can we use counting change in our everyday lives? Ask for examples.4.    Is learning to count money and change useful to you? Conditions:The behavior should be performed within as open class discussion before moving into individual work. Students should be relaxed, engaged, and motivated to learn. Instructional Objectives: The students should be active participants while performing the behavior. Motivation: Making math fun! Incorporating something special to help them count change. Jelly beans, popcorn, (some kind of treat). Explaining how counting can be useful in everyday life. Examples: allowance, tooth fairy, birthdays). They each will earn a chocolate coin during their formative assessment. Connection to Learning:Prior knowledge would be skip-counting and counting to 100. Building on skip-counting by giving individual coins value and understanding those values and how they build to a dollar. Vocabulary:Change: a combination of coins such as pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters.Penny: is worth 1 cent.Nickel: is worth 5 cents.Dime: is worth 10 cents.Quarter: is worth 25 cents. Materials:ComputerProjector or Smart boardThe Money Song, by Jack HartmannWorksheets: Let’s Make Change, Coins! Let’s Make ChangeCoins: pennies, nickels, dimes, quartersActivity: Race to a Dollar! And paperclipReward: Candy (of whatever reward you would like to use) Procedures:1.     Introduce the subject and the objective to the class.2.     Start off by asking a few questions a short pre-assessment about counting money. What  previous knowledge does the class know?3.     Explain the video we are going to watch that helps introduce the less. Explain how it  teaches the students about money: pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters. Let them know we are  going to learn a song about money to help them remember the important facts.4.     Watch the video once5.     Teach the students about the song. Work on the song together as a class.6.     Let the class know we are going to play a little game about making change after the video.7.      Watch the video a second time and have the students sing along.8.     Introduce the class activity: Race to a Dollar game9.      Explain the rules to the game and how the winner gets a reward. (You can play the game anyway you would like).10.    Once the game is over and the teacher feels comfortable that the class understood the lesson, pass out and explain the directions for the first or second worksheet.11.     Explain the instruction and dismiss the class to work independently. This is a great time to walk about and formally assess the students independently.12.     Hand out the second worksheet for homework.13.     Explain that we will continue to build on this lesson in the days to follow.14.    A summative assessment will be given at the end of the week. Assessment:Formative assessment - Worksheet: Coins! Let’s Make Change. The teacher will walk around and ask every student individually a questions about change in order to “buy” a chocolate wrapped quarter.  Ex: In order to “buy” this candy from me how can you use different coins to make 30 cents. The student answers: 3 dimes. The teacher will help each student through the question and assess their current knowledge.Summative assessment - quiz on the lesson, how to count change focusing on (pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters.)   Accommodations/Accommodations for special needs child:Teacher will allow for one on one instruction time once the class has been dismissed to work independently. The class activity will be accomplished with a partner that and or the students will partner up with a student and they will become a team during this activity. The formative assessment will stay the same and the summative assessment will have each student's individual needs and or accommodations as stated in their IEP.   Accommodations for ESL/ELL child: If necessary the teacher will have all directions and instructions written in the students dominate language as well as English to help them understand and accomplish the lesson.   Resources:State Standards: https://www.perma-bound.com/state-standards.do?state=NE&subject=mathematics&gradeLevel=2https://www.perma-bound.com/state-standards.do?state=NE&subject=arts-education&gradeLevel=KYouTube: The Money Song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pnXJGNo08v0Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/search/pins/?q=making%20change%20worksheets&rs=rs&eq=&etslf=3110&term_meta[]=making%7Crecentsearch%7Cundefined&term_meta[]=change%7Crecentsearch%7Cundefined&term_meta[]=worksheets%7Crecentsearch%7Cundefinedhttps://www.pinterest.com/pin/287597126182911466/ The Money Song | Penny, Nickel, Dime, QuarterBy, Jack Hartmann Penny, nickel, dime, quarter…Lets learnPenny, nickel, dime, quarter…Lets learn Money, money, money in my pocketMoney, money, I know how to count itMoney, money, money in my pocketMoney, money, I know how to count it What’s it worth? How much is a penny? 1 centHow much is a nickel? 5 centsHow much is a dime? 10 centsHow much is a quarter? 25 cents How much is a penny? 1 centHow much is a nickel? 5 centsHow much is a dime? 10 centsHow much is a quarter? 25 cents Money, money, money in my pocketMoney, money, I know how to count itMoney, money, money in my pocketMoney, money, I know how to count it What’s it worth? How much is a penny? 1 centHow much is a nickel? 5 centsHow much is a dime? 10 centsHow much is a quarter? 25 cents How much is a penny? 1 centHow much is a nickel? 5 centsHow much is a dime? 10 centsHow much is a quarter? 25 cents Money, money, money in my pocketMoney, money, I know how to count itMoney, money, money in my pocketMoney, money, I know how to count it Here is a penny and this is what it looks like…Penny, penny,A penny is worth? 1 centA penny is worth? 1 cent Here is a nickel and this is what it looks like…Nickel, nickelA nickel is worth? 5 centsA nickel is worth? 5 cents Here is a dime and this is what it looks like…Dime, dimeA dime is worth? 10 centsA dime is worth? 10 Cents Here is a quarter and this is what it looks like…Quarter, quarterA quarter is worth? 25 centsA quarter is worth? 25 cents Money, money, money in my pocketMoney, money, I know how to count itMoney, money, money in my pocketMoney, money, I know how to count it Money, money, money in my pocketMoney, money, I know how to count itMoney, money, money in my pocketMoney, money, I know how to count it Money, money, money in my pocketMoney, money, I know how to count itMoney, money, money in my pocketMoney, money, I know how to count it Money, money, money in my pocketMoney, money, I know how to count itMoney, money, money in my pocketMoney, money, I know how to count it

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Lauren Grabau
Date Added:
08/03/2020
3RC (Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and Compost)
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In this lesson, students expand their understanding of solid waste management to include the idea of 3RC (reduce, reuse, recycle and compost). They will look at the effects of packaging decisions (reducing) and learn about engineering advancements in packaging materials and solid waste management. Also, they will observe biodegradation in a model landfill (composting).

Subject:
Engineering
Ecology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Amy Kolenbrander
Janet Yowell
Jessica Todd
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Date Added:
09/18/2014
5.5 Theorems used in Finding Zeros of Polyomials
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This worksheet can be used as an in-class group worksheet or as a prequel to the lecture on this section. Students will describe each of the theorems introduced and give an example to show how it is used. After completion, discussion should include examples of finding zeros and how these theorems are helpful in the process.

Subject:
Mathematics
Algebra
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Sandy Porter
Date Added:
08/03/2020
5-Minute Film Festival: 8 Podcasts for Learning
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Intrigued by the world of podcasting? This Five-Minute Film Festival features videos, resources, and articles to help any educator get started using podcasts in the classroom as a learning tool.

Subject:
Educational Technology
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Author:
Amy Erin Borovoy
Date Added:
08/06/2020
6.2 Thermal Energy
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This unit on thermal energy transfer begins with students testing whether a new plastic cup sold by a store keeps a drink colder for longer compared to the regular plastic cup that comes free with the drink. Students find that the drink in the regular cup warms up more than the drink in the special cup. This prompts students to identify features of the cups that are different, such as the lid, walls, and hole for the straw, that might explain why one drink warms up more than the other.

Students investigate the different cup features they conjecture are important to explaining the phenomenon, starting with the lid. They model how matter can enter or exit the cup via evaporation However, they find that in a completely closed system, the liquid inside the cup still changes temperature. This motivates the need to trace the transfer of energy into the drink as it warms up. Through a series of lab investigations and simulations, students find that there are two ways to transfer energy into the drink: (1) the absorption of light and (2) thermal energy from the warmer air around the drink. They are then challenged to design their own drink container that can perform as well as the store-bought container, following a set of design criteria and constraints.

Subject:
Engineering
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Simulation
Student Guide
Unit of Study
Author:
Assessment Specialist David Fortus
BSCS Science Learning Ari Jamshidi
BSCS Science Learning Emily Harris
BSCS Science Learning Michael Novak
BSCS Science Learning Zoe Buck Bracey
Charles A. Center at UT-Austin Dawn Novak
Lindsey Mohan
Maple School Tyler Scaletta
North Shore Country Day School Katie Van Horne
Northwestern University Tracey Ramirez
Stanford University Abe Lo
Date Added:
08/04/2020
6.3 Weather, Climate & Water Cycling
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This unit on weather, climate, and water cycling is broken into four separate lesson sets. In the first two lesson sets, students explain small-scale storms. In the third and fourth lesson sets, students explain mesoscale weather systems and climate-level patterns of precipitation. Each of these two parts of the unit is grounded in a different anchoring phenomenon.

The unit starts out with anchoring students in the exploration of a series of videos of hailstorms from different locations across the country at different times of the year. The videos show that pieces of ice of different sizes (some very large) are falling out of the sky, sometimes accompanied by rain and wind gusts, all on days when the temperature of the air outside remained above freezing for the entire day. These cases spark questions and ideas for investigations, such as investigating how ice can be falling from the sky on a warm day, how clouds form, why some clouds produce storms with large amounts of precipitation and others don’t, and how all that water gets into the air in the first place.

The second half of the unit is anchored in the exploration of a weather report of a winter storm that affected large portions of the midwestern United States. The maps, transcripts, and video that students analyze show them that the storm was forecasted to produce large amounts of snow and ice accumulation in large portions of the northeastern part of the country within the next day. This case sparks questions and ideas for investigations around trying to figure out what could be causing such a large-scale storm and why it would end up affecting a different part of the country a day later.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Atmospheric Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Student Guide
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Author:
Assessment Specialist Colleen O’Brien
Boston College Emily Harris
BSCS Science Learning Audrey Mohan
BSCS Science Learning Dawn Novak
BSCS Science Learning Katie Van Horne
BSCS Science Learning Lindsey Mohan
BSCS Science Learning Tracey Ramirez
Columbia University Elisabeth Cohen
Indian Woods Middle School Ann Rivet
Indian Woods Middle School Whitney Smith
Lombard Middle School Vanessa Hannana
Michael Novak
Northwestern University Renee Affolter
Williston Central School Heather Galbreath
Date Added:
08/04/2020
6.EE.A.1 Lesson 2
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Students will evaluate numerical expressions with whole-number exponents.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Angela Vanderbloom
Date Added:
08/03/2020
6.NS.B.2 Lesson 1
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Overview: Prior to grade 6, students reasoned about division of whole numbers and decimals to the hundredths in different ways. During this lesson, they revisit two methods for finding quotients of whole numbers without remainder: using base-ten diagrams and using partial quotients. Reviewing these strategies reinforces students’ understanding of the underlying principles of base-ten division—which are based on the structure of place value, the properties of operations, and the relationship between multiplication and division—and paves the way for understanding the long division algorithm. Here, partial quotients are presented as vertical calculations, which also foreshadows long division.This lesson then introduces students to long division. Students see that in long division the meaning of each digit is intimately tied to its place value, and that it is an efficient way to find quotients. In the partial quotients method, all numbers and their meaning are fully and explicitly written out. For example, to find 657÷3 we write that there are at least 3 groups of 200, record a subtraction of 600, and show a difference of 57. In long division, instead of writing out all the digits, we rely on the position of any digit—of the quotient, of the number being subtracted, or of a difference—to convey its meaning, which simplifies the calculation.In addition to making sense of long division and using it to calculate quotients, students also analyze some place-value errors commonly made in long division (MP3).

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Angela Vanderbloom
Date Added:
08/06/2020
6.NS.B.2 Lesson 2
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Students review the standard long-division algorithm and discuss the different ways the answer to a whole-number division problem can be expressed (as a whole number plus a remainder, as a mixed number, or as a decimal).
Students solve a series of real-world problems that require the same whole number division operation, but have different answers because of how the remainder is interpreted.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Angela Vanderbloom
Date Added:
08/06/2020
6.NS.B.3 Lesson 2
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Students use area diagrams and partial products to represent and find products of decimals.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Angela Vanderbloom
Date Added:
08/10/2020
7.3 Metabolic Reactions
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This unit on metabolic reactions in the human body starts out with students exploring a real case study of a middle-school girl named M’Kenna, who reported some alarming symptoms to her doctor. Her symptoms included an inability to concentrate, headaches, stomach issues when she eats, and a lack of energy for everyday activities and sports that she used to play regularly. She also reported noticeable weight loss over the past few months, in spite of consuming what appeared to be a healthy diet. Her case sparks questions and ideas for investigations around trying to figure out which pathways and processes in M’Kenna’s body might be functioning differently than a healthy system and why.

Students investigate data specific to M’Kenna’s case in the form of doctor’s notes, endoscopy images and reports, growth charts, and micrographs. They also draw from their results from laboratory experiments on the chemical changes involving the processing of food and from digital interactives to explore how food is transported, transformed, stored, and used across different body systems in all people. Through this work of figuring out what is causing M’Kenna’s symptoms, the class discovers what happens to the food we eat after it enters our bodies and how M’Kenna’s different symptoms are connected.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Data Set
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Reading
Student Guide
Unit of Study
Author:
Abingdon-Avon High School Betty Stennett
Assessment Specialist Kelsey Edwards
BSCS Science Learning Jamie Noll
BSCS Science Learning Katie Van Horne
BSCS Science Learning Lindsey Mohan
Charles A. Dana Center at University of Texas Austin Heather Galbreath
John D. O’Bryant School of Mathematics and Science Nicole Vick
Lombard Middle School Michael Clinchot
Maine Mathematics and Science Alliance Kathryn Fattalah
Northwestern University Barbara Hug
Northwestern University Barbara Taylor
Northwestern University Kate Cook-Whitt
Northwestern University Michael Novak
Tara McGill
The Nora Project Emily Harris
Date Added:
08/05/2020