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1d. Geographers and Their Space
Conditions of Use:
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Humans are curious creatures, always wondering what lies beyond the horizon. Lewis and Clark did not describe themselves as geographers, but they might well have. Geography is the study of the surface of the earth. It is about people and places. It is about the physical character of a country, its climates and landscapes, and its biological environment.

Subject:
Ancient History
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
Ancient Civilizations
Date Added:
02/15/2018
3.1.1 What makes Michigan special?
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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A remix of Michigan social studies resources all in one place. In this foundational lesson students are introduced to the ways geographers look at places and the questions they ask. Students begin by reviewing the concept of ‘community’ and the geography of their local community by completing a class chart.

Subject:
Physical Geography
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider Set:
Collabrify Roadmap Center
Author:
GIANTS
MC3
Michigan Open Book
Monique Coulman
Date Added:
03/07/2020
3.1.2 Where is Michigan Located?
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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The Roadmap is a remix of Michigan resources all in one place. Students review relative and absolute (street address) location. They then use a Michigan map and cardinal directions to describe the relative location of their local community. Using a map of the United States and cardinal directions, students identify a variety of ways to describe the relative location of Michigan. The lesson concludes with a brief discussion of how location influences the development of a state. This lesson serves as the launching point for subsequent lessons in both history and economics.

Subject:
Physical Geography
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider Set:
Collabrify Roadmap Center
Author:
GIANTS
MC3
Michigan Open Book
Monique Coulman
Date Added:
03/07/2020
3.1.3 What are the Important Natural Characteristics of Michigan?
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After reviewing natural (physical) and human characteristics from Lesson 1, students use maps to identify and describe significant natural (physical) characteristics of Michigan including mountain ranges, sand dune areas, the Great Lakes, inland lakes and important rivers. In a connection to science students briefly explore how glaciers helped to create some of these natural (physical) characteristics. The lesson uses multiple resources including informational text, legends and photographs.

Subject:
Physical Geography
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider Set:
Collabrify Roadmap Center
Author:
GIANTS
MC3
Michigan Open Book
Monique Coulman
Date Added:
03/07/2020
3.1.4 What are the Important Natural Characteristics of Michigan?
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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In this lesson students continue their study of the important natural (physical) characteristics of Michigan by exploring vegetation and climate. They begin by analyzing special purpose maps of forests and orchards. Next they are introduced to the concept of climate, connecting to science topics of weather and seasons from previous grades. In addition, they briefly explore the impact of the Great Lakes on climate. The lesson also includes a chart reading activity dealing with Michigan state symbols.

Subject:
Physical Geography
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider Set:
Collabrify Roadmap Center
Author:
GIANTS
MC3
Michigan Open Book
Monique Coulman
Date Added:
03/07/2020
3.1.5 Why are the Great Lakes great?
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Remix and Share
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Important bodies of water include the Great Lakes, inland lakes, rivers and waterfalls. In a connection to science students briefly explore how glaciers helped to create some of these natural (physical) characteristics. The lesson uses multiple resources including informational text, legends and photographs.

Subject:
Physical Geography
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider Set:
Collabrify Roadmap Center
Author:
GIANTS
MC3
Michigan Open Book
Monique Coulman
Date Added:
03/07/2020
3.1.6 What are the Important Human Characteristics in Michigan?
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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The Roadmap is a remix of the Michigan Open Book, MC3 and GIANTS all in one place. In this lesson students continue their study of the geographic theme of ‘place’ by exploring significant human characteristics of Michigan including bridges, cities, highways and lighthouses. In addition, students explore how people interact with natural (physical) characteristics by creating human characteristics (e.g. bridges are built over rivers, towns are built along bays.)

Subject:
Physical Geography
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider Set:
Collabrify Roadmap Center
Author:
GIANTS
MC3
Michigan Open Book
Monique Coulman
Date Added:
03/07/2020
3.1.7 How can Michigan be Divided in Regions?
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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The Roadmap is a remix of the Michigan Open Book, MC3 and GIANTS all in one place. This lesson expands upon the concept of region by having students invent ways to divide Michigan into regions. Students compare the Lower Peninsula and Upper Peninsula of Michigan and then explore other ways in which Michigan can be divided into regions based on common characteristics (e.g., the Thumb, the Fruit Belt). Finally students examine regions to which Michigan belongs. (e.g., Great Lakes Region, Midwest).

Subject:
Physical Geography
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider Set:
Collabrify Roadmap Center
Author:
GIANTS
MC3
Michigan Open Book
Monique Coulman
Date Added:
03/07/2020
3rd Grade Michigan Social Studies (Chapters 1-4)
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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This Roadmap is a full year plan that covers the geography, economics, government and history of Michigan.

Subject:
History
Physical Geography
Social Science
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider Set:
Collabrify Roadmap Center
Author:
GIANTS
MC3
Michigan Open Book
Monique Coulman
Date Added:
03/11/2020
The 4-Point Backyard Diurnal Parallax Method
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
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On field, students have to image a given asteroid on two consecutive nights, producing two sets of images obtained over 10-15 minutes, each set separated by about 4-5 hours. In class, students have to process the images in order to measure the observed diurnal parallax and then determine the corresponding asteroid distance.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Eduardo Manuel Alvarez
Date Added:
12/11/2019
Accelerated Motion
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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A complete model for describing 1-D accelerated motion (descriptive, motion maps, graphs and kinematic equations).  Begins with a paradigm lab of motion on an incline.  The lab utilizes Vernier Logger Pro motion detectors the way I implement it, but can be done with other methods of data collection.

Subject:
Physical Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Michigan Virtual
Author:
Terry Bochenek
Date Added:
06/30/2016
Acid-Base Solutions
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

How do strong and weak acids differ? Use lab tools on your computer to find out! Dip the paper or the probe into solution to measure the pH, or put in the electrodes to measure the conductivity. Then see how concentration and strength affect pH. Can a weak acid solution have the same pH as a strong acid solution?

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Chris Malley
Kathy Perkins
Kelly Lancaster
Patricia Loeblein
Robert Parson
Date Added:
09/01/2010
The Advantage of Machines
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

In this lesson, students learn about work as defined by physical science and see that work is made easier through the use of simple machines. Already encountering simple machines everyday, students will be alerted to their widespread uses in everyday life. This lesson serves as the starting point for the Simple Machines Unit.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Glen Sirakavit
Janet Yowell
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Melissa Straten
Michael Bendewald
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Afterimage
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

In this activity about light and perception, learners discover how a flash of light can create a lingering image called an "afterimage" on the retina of the eye. Learners will be surprised when they continue to see an image of a bright object after staring at it and looking away. Use this activity to introduce learners to principles of optics and perception as well as to explain why the full moon often appears larger when it is on the horizon than when it is overhead. This lesson guide also includes a few extensions like how to take "afterimage photographs."

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Exploratorium
Provider Set:
Science Snacks
Date Added:
09/04/2019
Agar Cell Diffusion
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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All biological cells require the transport of materials across the plasma membrane into and out of the cell. By infusing cubes of agar with a pH indicator, and then soaking the treated cubes in vinegar, you can model how diffusion occurs in cells. Then, by observing cubes of different sizes, you can discover why larger cells might need extra help to transport materials.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Exploratorium
Provider Set:
Science Snacks
Date Added:
09/04/2019
Air Masses
Rating

This is Activity 12 of a set of Level 1 activities designed by the Science Center for Teaching, Outreach, and Research on Meteorology (STORM) Project. The authors suggest that previous activities in the unit be completed before Activity 12: Air Masses, including those that address pressure systems and dew point temperature. In Activity 12, the students learn about the four main types of air masses that affect weather in the United States, their characteristic temperatures, and humidity levels as it relates to dew point temperatures. The lesson plan follows the 5E format. Initially, students discuss local weather and then examine surface temperature and dew point data on maps to determine patterns and possible locations of air masses. They learn about the source regions of air masses and compare their maps to a forecast weather map with fronts and pressure systems drawn in. During the Extension phase, students access current maps with surface and dew point temperatures at http://www.uni.edu/storm/activities/level1 and try to identify locations of air masses. They sketch in fronts and compare their results to the fronts map. Evaluation consists of collection of student papers.

Subject:
Atmospheric Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)
University of Northern Iowa
Provider Set:
NGSS@NSTA
Science Center for Teaching, Outreach, and Research on Meteorology (STORM)
Date Added:
02/16/2018
All Things Being Equal
Rating

This set of a teacher and student guides provides instruction on a 2-3 day series of activities about Le Chatelier’s principle, which shows the effect of changes to conditions in an equilibrium reaction. Students work in pairs or groups to develop their concepts of equilibrium and the effects of changing the amount of reactants or products on an equilibrium system. The concepts are presented and analyzed using graphical representations, qualitative lab data, and modelling. The first part addresses the misconception that equal amounts are required for equilibrium through using a mini-activity that involves the transfer of water between beakers. The second part is a lab activity where students will see how an equilibrium system reacts to a change in concentration. The third part uses manipulatives to understand how an equilibrium operates using the mathematical equilibrium constant (Ksp) at the particulate view.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Grand Valley State University, Target Inquiry
National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)
Provider Set:
NGSS@NSTA
Date Added:
02/16/2018
The Amazing Red Planet
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The purpose of this lesson is to introduce students to the planet Mars. This lesson will begin by discussing the location and size of Mars relative to Earth, as well as introduce many interesting facts about this red planet. Next, the history of Martian exploration is reviewed and students discover why scientists are so interested in studying this mysterious planet. The lesson concludes with students learning about future plans to visit Mars.

Subject:
Engineering
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Chris Yakacki
Daria Kotys-Schwartz
Geoffrey Hill
Janet Yowell
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Date Added:
09/18/2014