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2a. "I Love Lucy"
Conditions of Use:
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Lucy belonged to genus Australopithecus and the species afarensis, but she also belonged to the the hominid family (hominidae) to which humans belong. Although humans are of the family hominidae, we are not of Lucy's genus or species. We are Homo sapiens. How then, can Lucy be our ancient ancestor if we belong to a different genus and species? It's because humans and Lucy share a taxonomy up to the point of genus and species; there are many shared characteristics, but there are differences and these differences place humans in our own genus and species.

Subject:
Ancient History
Archaeology
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
Ancient Civilizations
Date Added:
02/15/2018
Archeology for Interpreters, A Guide to the Knowledge of the Resource
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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Help students learn about archaeological methods and how archaeological interpretations are made. It is organized around questions that include: What is archeology? What do archaeologists do? How do archaeologists determine how old things are?

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Archaeology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Provider Set:
National Register of Historic Places
Date Added:
07/08/2003
Carbon 14 Dating
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
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The task requires the student to use logarithms to solve an exponential equation in the realistic context of carbon dating, important in archaeology and geology, among other places. Students should be guided to recognize the use of the natural logarithm when the exponential function has the given base of e, as in this problem. Note that the purpose of this task is algebraic in nature -- closely related tasks exist which approach similar problems from numerical or graphical stances.

Subject:
Mathematics
Functions
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Illustrative Mathematics
Provider Set:
Illustrative Mathematics
Author:
Illustrative Mathematics
Date Added:
05/01/2012
History & Culture
Conditions of Use:
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offers educators Park Service resources that help teach about our nation's cultural heritage, and which look at how the NPS is protecting and preserving them. Subjects include archaeology, historic buildings and structures, mapping, military history, and national historic landmarks. The resources may be in the form of learning programs, case studies, lesson plans, teachers' handbooks, and more.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Archaeology
Material Type:
Case Study
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Date Added:
12/01/2004
Lascaux
Conditions of Use:
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Take a virtual tour of the prehistoric caves at Lascaux, France. The discovery of Lascaux in 1940 opened a new page in the knowledge of prehistoric art and our origins. Monumental work, the cave continues to feed the imagination and move the new generations of the world. This website is intended to help understand the secrets of the artists who painted and engraved bestiary at Lascaux 19,000 years ago, and to present the current trends in scientific research on the painted caves.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
World Cultures
Archaeology
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
Ministry of Culture and Communication, France
Provider Set:
Art History
Date Added:
03/20/2020
Managing Archeological Collections
Conditions of Use:
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An online technical assistance and distance learning effort covering all aspects of curation -- caring for archaeological collections such as objects, records, reports, and digital data -- wherever they may be (in the field, the archeologist's office, the lab, or a repository).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Archaeology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Date Added:
03/16/2001
The Robinson House: A Portrait of African American Heritage
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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Pieces together the story of the James Robinson family from artifacts found in archaeological excavations around the house where they lived for nearly a century. An African American born free in 1799, Robinson worked in a Virginia tavern earning nearly $500 to purchase 170 acres of land near Bull Run. There he built a log cabin, and his family turned the land into a prosperous farm, making him one of the wealthiest African Americans in the Manassas area in the mid-19th century.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Archaeology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Date Added:
01/29/2004