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  • MI.SS.MS.PS1.2 - Analyze and interpret data on the properties of substances before and ...
7.1 Chemical Reactions & Matter Transformations
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Students' conceptual understanding of chemical reactions is foundational to much science learning. Understanding atomic level reactions is crucial for learning physical, life, earth, and space science. Even more importantly, they open up new windows of curiosity for students to see the world around them. By seventh grade, students are ready to take on the abstract nature of the interactions of atoms and molecules far too small to see.

To pique students’ curiosity and anchor the learning for the unit in the visible and concrete, students start with an experience of observing and analyzing a bath bomb as it fizzes and eventually disappears in the water. Their observations and questions about what is going on drive learning that digs into a series of related phenomena as students iterate and improve their models depicting what happens during chemical reactions. By the end of the unit, students have a firm grasp on how to model simple molecules, know what to look for to determine if chemical reactions have occurred, and apply their knowledge to chemical reactions to show how mass is conserved when atoms are rearranged.

Embedded in this unit are a variety of assessments, including self, peer, formative, and summative assessment tasks. This unit concludes with a transfer task in which students apply what they have figured out to two different related phenomena, elephant’s toothpaste and the crumbling of the marble that makes up the Taj Mahal.

Subject:
Chemistry
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Date Added:
08/18/2020
7.3 Metabolic Reactions
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This unit on metabolic reactions in the human body starts out with students exploring a real case study of a middle-school girl named M’Kenna, who reported some alarming symptoms to her doctor. Her symptoms included an inability to concentrate, headaches, stomach issues when she eats, and a lack of energy for everyday activities and sports that she used to play regularly. She also reported noticeable weight loss over the past few months, in spite of consuming what appeared to be a healthy diet. Her case sparks questions and ideas for investigations around trying to figure out which pathways and processes in M’Kenna’s body might be functioning differently than a healthy system and why.

Students investigate data specific to M’Kenna’s case in the form of doctor’s notes, endoscopy images and reports, growth charts, and micrographs. They also draw from their results from laboratory experiments on the chemical changes involving the processing of food and from digital interactives to explore how food is transported, transformed, stored, and used across different body systems in all people. Through this work of figuring out what is causing M’Kenna’s symptoms, the class discovers what happens to the food we eat after it enters our bodies and how M’Kenna’s different symptoms are connected.

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Applied Science
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Data Set
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Reading
Student Guide
Unit of Study
Author:
Abingdon-Avon High School Betty Stennett
Assessment Specialist Kelsey Edwards
BSCS Science Learning Jamie Noll
BSCS Science Learning Katie Van Horne
BSCS Science Learning Lindsey Mohan
Charles A. Dana Center at University of Texas Austin Heather Galbreath
John D. O’Bryant School of Mathematics and Science Nicole Vick
Lombard Middle School Michael Clinchot
Maine Mathematics and Science Alliance Kathryn Fattalah
Northwestern University Barbara Hug
Northwestern University Barbara Taylor
Northwestern University Kate Cook-Whitt
Northwestern University Michael Novak
Tara McGill
The Nora Project Emily Harris
Date Added:
08/05/2020
Acid-Base Solutions
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CC BY
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How do strong and weak acids differ? Use lab tools on your computer to find out! Dip the paper or the probe into solution to measure the pH, or put in the electrodes to measure the conductivity. Then see how concentration and strength affect pH. Can a weak acid solution have the same pH as a strong acid solution?

Subject:
Chemistry
Physical Science
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Chris Malley
Kathy Perkins
Kelly Lancaster
Patricia Loeblein
Robert Parson
Date Added:
09/01/2010
Afterimage
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CC BY-NC-SA
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In this activity about light and perception, learners discover how a flash of light can create a lingering image called an "afterimage" on the retina of the eye. Learners will be surprised when they continue to see an image of a bright object after staring at it and looking away. Use this activity to introduce learners to principles of optics and perception as well as to explain why the full moon often appears larger when it is on the horizon than when it is overhead. This lesson guide also includes a few extensions like how to take "afterimage photographs."

Subject:
Physical Science
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Exploratorium
Provider Set:
Science Snacks
Date Added:
09/04/2019
Anatomy and Physiology I
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CC BY
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Includes the study of the gross and microscopic structure of the systems of the human body with special emphasis on the relationship between structure and function. Integrates anatomy and physiology of cells, tissues, organs, the systems of the human body, and mechanisms responsible for homeostasis.

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Life Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
Lumen Learning
Provider Set:
Candela Courseware
Date Added:
02/16/2018
Assess Burn Scars with Satellite Imagery
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CC BY-NC-SA
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In this project, you'll assume the role of a geospatial scientist working with the Montana Forestry Department to analyze the damage in Glacier National Park. You'll first compare Landsat 8 imagery from before and after the fires. Then, you'll change the band combination of the post-fire imagery in order to emphasize burn scars and make a qualitative judgment. Afterward, you'll quantify your assessment by calculating a Normalized Burn Index (a ratio designed to highlight burned areas) from the imagery. Lastly, you'll create a feature class to represent the burn scar, calculate its acreage, and publish it to ArcGIS Online to share with the department.

Subject:
Applied Science
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Michigan Virtual
Author:
GRACE Project
Date Added:
12/27/2016
Basically Acidic Ink
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Educational Use
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Students hypothesize whether vinegar and ammonia-based glass cleaner are acids or bases. They create designs on index cards using these substances as invisible inks. After the index cards have dried, they apply red cabbage juice as an indicator to reveal the designs.

Subject:
Applied Science
Chemistry
Engineering
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Christine Hawthorne
Corey Burton
Nicole Stewart
Rachel Howser
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Bath Bombs PowerPoint
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Contains instructions on how to make bath bombs and the sciencce behind why they fizz.
This is a nice end-of-term activity.

Subject:
Chemistry
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Author:
Chemistry_Teacher
Date Added:
06/12/2021
CK-12 Physical Science Concepts for Middle School
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CC BY-NC-SA
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CK-12 Physical Science Concepts covers the study of physical science for middle school students. The 5 chapters provide an introduction to physical science, matter, states of matter, chemical interactions and bonds, chemical reactions, motion and forces, and the types and characteristics of energy.

Subject:
Chemistry
Physical Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
CK-12 Foundation
Provider Set:
CK-12 FlexBook
Author:
Jean Brainard, Ph.D.
Date Added:
11/01/2012
Digestion Simulation
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To reinforce students' understanding of the human digestion process, the functions of several stomach and small intestine fluids are analyzed, and the concept of simulation is introduced through a short, introductory demonstration of how these fluids work. Students learn what simulation means and how it relates to the engineering process, particularly in biomedical engineering. The teacher demo requires vinegar, baking soda, water and aspirin.

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Applied Science
Engineering
Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Denise W. Carlson
Jacob Crosby
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Exploring Water Quality
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CC BY
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There are many different ways to precisely measure the quality of water in a river. Environmental scientists and volunteers all over the state of Michigan are continuously collecting measurements of the quality of water in rivers, streams, and lakes. Students will look at two of these measures to see how they change with location around the state and along a river. The first measure of water quality is called "water conductance" - that is, how well a water sample can conduct electricity. A higher water conductance generally means lower water quality. The second measure of water quality is "pH." pH is a measure of how acidic or basic water is. Successful students will be able to interpret and analyze data using these two measures to better understand Michigan water quality.

Subject:
Applied Science
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Michigan Virtual
Author:
GRACE Project
Date Added:
12/27/2016
Fizzy Balloons - CO2 in School
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CC BY
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When you add water to effervescent (fizzy) tablets or baking powder, bubbles are formed: a gas is produced. You can use this gas to inflate a balloon without blowing it up yourself. What kind of gas is it? Let us collect this gas and analyse it through experiments.

Subject:
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Date Added:
01/01/2016
Garden Science: Soil pH Lab
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CC BY-NC
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In this 8th grade science lesson, students test the pH levels of soil from three different sites in the garden to determine the level of acidity in the garden soil.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
OER Commons
Author:
Kyle Cornforth
Date Added:
02/21/2018
How Much Sugar is in Bubble Gum?
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Educational Use
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Most of the flavoring in gum is due to the sugar or other sweetener it contains. As gum is chewed, the sugar dissolves and is swallowed. After a piece of gum loses its flavor, it can be left to dry at room temperature and then the difference between its initial (unchewed) mass and its chewed mass can be used to calculate the percentage of sugar in the gum. This demonstration experiment is used to generate new questions about gums and their ingredients, and students can then design and execute new experiments based on their own questions.

Subject:
Applied Science
Engineering
Life Science
Nutrition
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Mary R. Hebrank
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Introductory lesson to elements and compounds
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CC BY-NC-SA
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A short introductory presentation for elements and compounds. Also includes a practice worksheet and opportunity for a lab (moving into chemical reactions).

Subject:
Chemistry
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Share My Lesson Science Team
Date Added:
06/12/2021
Is it a chemical reaction?
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Students are given information about signs of a chemical reaction on the first slide.
They then have to work in groups to decide which of the examples on the second slide are chemical reactions, and which are physical changes.

Subject:
Chemistry
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Chemistry_Teacher
Date Added:
06/12/2021
Kitchen Science: Kale Pesto and Ricotta - A pH Lab
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CC BY-NC
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In this 8th grade science lesson, students prepare Kale Pesto and Homemade Ricotta Cheese. Students also visit the pH Lab where they use cabbage juice as an indicator to test the pH of common kitchen ingredients and products.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
OER Commons
Author:
Kyle Cornforth
Date Added:
02/21/2018
Kitchen Science: Soft Pretzels – Chemical Reactions: Biological Leaveners in Baking
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CC BY-NC
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In this 8th grade science lesson, students prepare Soft Pretzels. While the pretzels bake in the oven, students activate yeast and observe the production of carbon dioxide, which causes the Soft Pretzels to rise.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
OER Commons
Author:
Kyle Cornforth
Date Added:
02/21/2018