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ABC Bookmaking Builds Vocabulary in the Content Areas
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V is for vocabulary. A content area unit provides the theme for a specialized ABC book, as students select, research, define, and illustrate a word for each alphabet letter.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
06/13/2021
ANALYZING AUTHOR’S CRAFT: CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT IN PETER PAN
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

In this unit, students begin reading a retold version of the literary classic Peter Pan to build their understanding of how the historical context of a literary classic can have an impact on the content and also to analyze how writers develop characters to capture a reader's imagination. In the first half of the unit, students read an informational text to build background knowledge about the author, J.M. Barrie, and some of the relevant aspects of society in Great Britain at the time the original novel was written. Students then focus on analyzing how the events in each chapter build on what came before and consider how the illustrations in the first four chapters of Peter Pan contribute to the meaning of the text. After reading each chapter, students make connections between the historical context and the content of the chapter.
For the mid-unit assessment, students closely read a new chapter of Peter Pan and answer selected response and short-constructed response questions about the text. In the second half of the unit, through teacher-guided close reading, independent close reading, and discussion, students analyze the characters by carefully examining their traits, motivations, actions, and points of view. They also analyze figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meaning to gain a deeper understanding of the meaning of the text. For the end of unit assessment, students closely read another new chapter of Peter Pan, answer selected response questions, and complete a table to analyze the character traits, motivations, actions, and points of view.
RL.3.1, RL.3.2, RL.3.4, RL.3.5, RL.3.6, RL.3.7, RL.3.10, L.3.4, L.3.5.

Subject:
Elementary Education
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Case Study
Homework/Assignment
Date Added:
03/30/2021
Accepting Ourselves and Others
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In this unit, students read the core texts The Hundred Dresses and Garvey’s Choice as a way of exploring what it means to be accepting and tolerant of themselves and others. The Hundred Dresses challenges students to think about the different roles associated with bullying through the eyes of the narrator, who struggles with her own involvement with a classmate who is bullied. Garvey’s Choice illustrates the way others influence the way we see ourselves, both positively and negatively, and the power of accepting ourselves by tracing Garvey’s path to self-discovery and acceptance. Both texts are full of moments and messages that are easily relatable for students at this grade level. Therefore, it is our hope that the experiences of the characters in both texts will serve as a neutral launching point for deeper discussions about bullying, tolerance, acceptance, and forgiveness.

In reading, the main focus of the unit is on identifying and tracing the central message across a longer text. Over the course of the text, students will develop a deep understanding of each character’s thoughts, feelings, and motivations, which will help them identify and explain how the central message is developed and conveyed through the characters. Students will also begin to understand how successive parts of a text build on each other to push the plot forward. Particularly with Garvey’s Choice, students will analyze the genre features of novels written in verse and how each part helps build and develop the central message. This unit also focused on point of view. Students will begin to notice the point of view in which a story is told and compare that with their own point of view.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Match Fishtank
Provider Set:
Fishtank ELA
Date Added:
01/01/2017
Active Reading through Self-Assessment: The Student-Made Quiz
Rating

This recurring lesson encourages students to comprehend their reading through inquiry and collaboration. They choose important quotations from the text and work in groups to formulate "quiz" questions that their peers will answer.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
06/13/2021
African American Protest Poetry, Freedom's Story, TeacherServe®, National Humanities Center
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

Given the secondary position of persons of African descent throughout their history in America, it could reasonably be argued that all efforts of creative writers from that group are forms of protest. However, for purposes of this discussion, Defining African American protest poetrysome parameters might be drawn. First—a definition. Protest, as used herein, refers to the practice within African American literature of bringing redress to the secondary status of black people, of attempting to achieve the acceptance of black people into the larger American body politic, of encouraging practitioners of democracy truly to live up to what democratic ideals on American soil mean. Protest literature consists of a variety of approaches, from the earliest literary efforts to contemporary times. These include articulating the plight of enslaved persons, challenging the larger white community to change its attitude toward those persons, and providing specific reference points for the nature of the complaints presented. In other words, the intention of protest literature was—and remains—to show inequalities among races and socio-economic groups in America and to encourage a transformation in the society that engenders such inequalities. For African Americans, Some of the questions motivating African American protest poetrythat inequality began with slavery. How, in a country that professed belief in an ideal democracy, could one group of persons enslave another? What forms of moral persuasion could be used to get them to see the error of their ways? In addition, how, in a country that professed belief in Christianity, could one group enslave persons whom Christian doctrine taught were their brothers and sisters? And the list of “hows” goes on. How could white Americans justify Jim Crow? Inequalities in education, housing, jobs, accommodation, transportation, and a host of other things? In response to these “hows,” another “how” emerged. How could writers use their imaginations and pens to bring about change in the society? Protest literature, therefore, focused on such issues and worked to rectify them. Poetry is but one of the media through which writers address such issues, as there are forms of protest fiction, drama, essays, and anything else that African Americans wrote—and write.

Subject:
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson
Reading
Author:
National Humanities Center
Trudier Harris
Date Added:
08/10/2020
'Ain't I a woman?' by Sojourner Truth and 'I have a dream' by Martin Luther King.
Rating

Exploring poetic and speaking & listening techniques and devices in the poem - 'Ain't I a woman?' by Sojourner Truth and Martin Luther King's 'I have a dream' speech. Worksheets and resources focusing on the lexical choices in the texts, and the effects of these.

Subject:
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Author:
Share My Lesson TES Resource Team
Date Added:
05/22/2021
Alaska Native Stories: Using Narrative to Introduce Expository Text
Rating

Tradition and technology come together in this lesson in which students learn about Alaskan animals through Native American tales and their own online research.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
06/13/2021
Alphabiography Project: Totally You
Rating

The traditional autobiography writing project is given a twist as students write alphabiographies - recording an event, person, object, or feeling associated with each letter of the alphabet.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
06/13/2021
American Folklore: A Jigsaw Character Study
Rating

Groups of students read and discuss American folklore stories, each group reading a different story. Using a jigsaw strategy, the groups compare character traits and main plot points of the stories. A diverse selection of American folk tales is used for this lesson, which is adaptable to any text set.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
06/13/2021
Analyzing and Podcasting About Images of Oscar Wilde
Rating

Students analyze images of Oscar Wilde used to publicize his 1882 American lecture tour. They then compare a caricature to another researched image, sharing this analysis in a podcast.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
06/13/2021
Animate that Haiku!
Rating

Following the traditional form of the haiku, students publish their own haikus using Animoto, an online web tool that creates slideshows that blend text and music.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
06/13/2021
Audience & Purpose: Evaluating Disney's Changes to the Hercules Myth
Rating

What drives changes to classic myths and fables? In this lesson students evaluate the changes Disney made to the myth of "Hercules" in order to achieve their audience and purpose.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
06/13/2021
Audience, Purpose, and Language Use in Electronic Messages
Rating

Students explore using electronic messaging and Internet abbreviations for specific purposes and examine the importance of using a more formal style of writing based on their audience.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
06/13/2021
Avalanche, Aztek, or Bravada? A Connotation Minilesson
Rating

Students examine familiar car names for underlying connotations then proceed through a series of steps, increasing their control over language, until they select words with powerful connotations in their own writing.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
06/13/2021
BOOKMATCH: Scaffolding Independent Book Selection
Rating

This lesson will be turning heads and pages as students learn how to choose appropriate books for independent reading exercises and later evaluate their choices.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
06/13/2021
The Beauties of Fall
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In this unit, students begin a year-long exploration of the seasons and how weather, plants, and animals are different depending on the season by studying the beauties of fall and fall harvests. Students launch the unit by setting up an ongoing weather experiment in order to understand the patterns of fall and how weather changes during fall. While gathering on-going data about the changing weather in fall, students will learn and observe what happens to leaves in the fall and notice the difference between various types of leaves. In the second half of the unit, students explore the different harvests of fall, particularly apples and pumpkins, and discuss the basic life cycles of both. This unit is a chance for students to stop and think about the changes that are happening in the natural world around them and why the changes happen. It is our hope that by the end of the year, after studying winter and spring in subsequent units, students will have a deeper understanding of the unique features of each season.

In reading, this is students’ first introduction to informational texts and reading to learn information. Students will continue to develop their inquisitive side by being challenged to ask and answer questions about the content and text they are interacting with. This unit exposes students to a subject matter that is present in their day-to-day lives; therefore, they should be challenged to ask questions and make connections between what they are reading and learning and what they are seeing outside. Additionally, while listening to stories, students will learn how to use the text and illustrations to determine the key details of a text and then use those details to retell what the text was mostly about. Students will also continue to understand the author’s and illustrator’s roles in writing texts and should be able to identify and explain both by the end of the unit. In this unit, students will also begin to explore the content in-depth by participating in labs and projects. These teacher-created projects will allow students to interact with and synthesize the material they are learning at an even deeper level.

In writing, students will continue to write daily in response to the text. As with units 1 and 2, students are focusing on using correct details from the text to answer the question. Students should be using a combination of words and pictures, depending on the student’s development as a writer. Daily teaching points, based on student data, should be included to ensure that students are progressing as writers.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Match Fishtank
Provider Set:
Fishtank ELA
Date Added:
01/01/2017
The Beauties of Winter
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In this unit, students explore the beauties of winter. In the first part of the unit students pretend to be meteorologists as they learn about different weather forecasts and the words that meteorologists use to describe the weather in winter. Students start by exploring generic weather words and then transition into winter-specific words. In the second part of the unit, students explore how animals survive in the winter and the ways in which animals meet their basic needs, even when the ground is covered with ice and snow. In the last part of the unit, students read a variety of Jan Brett texts and use what they have learned about snow and animals to make inferences about what is happening with the different winter animals in the text. By the end of the unit, students should have a strong grasp of what makes winter unique and the different ways plants and animals survive in the winter. Due to the timing of this unit, it is our hope that students will have plenty of opportunities to interact with the vocabulary and content in the natural world around them. When outside for recess or anytime that it snows, students should be pushed to use the vocabulary and content they are learning in the unit so that the content can fully come to life.

In reading, this unit is predominately a collection of informational texts and builds on skills and strategies from earlier units. At this point it is assumed that students are inquisitive consumers of text and are able to ask and answer questions about a text in order to deepen understanding of the content. In this unit, students will continue to be challenged to identify the main topic of a text, retell the key details that connect to the main topic, describe the connection between ideas in a text, and use the illustrations and words to describe and retell what is happening in a text with varying levels of teacher support. Students will also begin to use strategies to ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text, specifically those connected to weather and snow. As part of daily text introductions, students will also continue to explore the purpose behind text features, specifically the front cover, back cover, and title page of a book, and how each feature supports understanding of the text. Many of the skills and strategies in this unit are spiraled from earlier units or will be spiraled through upcoming units; therefore, it is up to the teacher to decide what level of support students need with the particular strategy and scaffold accordingly.

In writing, students will continue to write daily in response to the text. At this point in the year, students should be using a combination of drawing and words to correctly answer the question. Pick focus teaching points based on data from previous units and individual student needs.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Match Fishtank
Provider Set:
Fishtank ELA
Date Added:
01/01/2017
Biographies: Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In this unit, students begin to explore African-American history and the civil rights movement by studying Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King Jr. and their influence on the nation. Students will begin the unit by thinking about the ways in which people are similar and different, including skin color, and how those differences should not define who we are or how we are treated. In the second part of the unit, students will learn about the discrimination and injustices faced by African-Americans during the civil rights movement and why it was necessary to fight for change. Finally, students will explore Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King Jr. and study how their influential leadership drove the civil rights movement and influenced and inspired others to fight for change. It is our hope that this unit will help instill the values of diversity and fairness, and that it will serve as a launch for further discussions around discrimination, fairness, and valuing individuals. This unit also falls during the month of February. Therefore, it will give students a chance to explore and deepen their understanding of Black History Month and why studying and celebrating black history is an important part of our nation’s history.

In reading, this unit exposes students to the genre of biography. For each influential leader, students will read multiple biographies, noticing the ways in which authors use specific details to support points in a text. Students will also be pushed to think about which details are key details, how details are connected, how illustrations connect to particular points and ideas in a text, and the meaning of unfamiliar words. After reading multiple biographies, students will then compare and contrast the ways in which the authors present points in both texts. Students will also be challenged to think about the themes that develop across the biographies, particularly in regards to what makes the person an influential leader and the lessons that can be learned from studying each person.

In writing, this unit pushes students to begin answering questions using words and sentences, and, therefore, rely less on picture support. Students will also continue to work on answering the question and including an inference or critical thinking that shows a deeper understanding of the text. At this point, all structure focus correction areas should be taught; therefore, the focus of this unit should be on providing individualized feedback to students who are not at a 3 or 4 on the rubric.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Match Fishtank
Provider Set:
Fishtank ELA
Date Added:
01/01/2017
BlendEd Best Practices Unit Text Structure
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In this unit students will define, identify, and explain 5 types of text structure. Students will explain how text and graphic features enhance a text. They will determine the type of figurative language used in a text. Students will summarize a given text.

Subject:
Education
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Author:
BlendEd Best Practices Unit Text Structure
Carrie Veal
Date Added:
06/14/2021
BlendEd Best Practices Unit Text Structure
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In this unit students will define, identify, and explain 5 types of text structure. Students will explain how text and graphic features enhance a text. They will determine the type of figurative language used in a text. Students will summarize a given text.

Subject:
Language Education (ESL)
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Author:
Rick Meyer
Date Added:
05/29/2021
Blending the Past with Today's Technology: Using Prezi to Prepare for Historical Fiction
Rating

To prepare for literature circles featuring historical novels, students research the decades of the 1930s to the 1990s and share their information using Prezi, a web application for creating multimedia presentations.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
06/14/2021
Book Report Alternative: A Character's Letter to the Editor
Rating

Students write a persuasive letter to the editor of a newspaper from a selected fictional character's perspective, focusing on a specific issue or situation explored in the novel.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
06/14/2021
Book Report Alternative: Comic Strips and Cartoon Squares
Rating

Students must think critically to create comic strips highlighting six important scenes from a book they have read.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
06/14/2021
Book Review (Open Up Resources - bookworms - Grade 2 ELA Lesson Plans)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

Week 3, Day 5
Book Review
Students will write a book review about either Alexander Who Used to be Rich Last Sunday or A New Coat for Anna.
Book Review Checklist Sample
Book Review Graphic Organizer

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
04/02/2021
The Breadwinner
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In this unit students explore the Taliban influence on the Middle East through the eyes of multiple young women. In the core text, The Breadwinner, students experience how the Taliban presence in Afghanistan drastically altered Parvana and her family’s life. Students will be challenged to think about what constitutes basic human rights and the way in which the Taliban violated the human rights of many Afghanistan citizens. Students will also be challenged to think about women’s rights, especially in regard to education and freedom, and how both were constantly at risk under Taliban rule. Finally, students will realize that a positive attitude, dedication to family, and drive to be self-reliant can help people survive, and thrive, in the worst of situations. In the second part of the unit, students read about the experiences of real children living in Afghanistan after the Taliban left. Through those experiences, students explore how education and women’s rights are still restricted in Afghanistan and grapple with what it will take to create a society where women have access to the same basic freedoms as men. In the last part of the unit, students meet Malala Yousafzai and analyze how her positive attitude and drive help her fight for women’s rights in Pakistan despite facing incredible challenges and threats. Over the course of the entire unit, it is our hope that students will build a deeper understanding of the importance of women’s rights and access to education around the world, particularly in the Middle East.

As readers, this unit builds onto unit one by pushing students to compare and contrast characters and analyze character point of view at an even deeper level. Students will be challenged to close read the text, make accurate annotations, and quote accurately in order to develop theories about key characters in and across texts. In this unit, students will also begin to use informational texts, particularly memories and first-person accounts, to help build a deeper understanding of fiction texts. The focus for informational reading is similar to the focus for fiction, and students will analyze how the point of view influences the way in which events are described.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Match Fishtank
Provider Set:
Fishtank ELA
Date Added:
01/01/2017
Breaking Barriers, Building Bridges: Critical Discussion of Social Issues
Rating

Through a series of picture book read-alouds, students engage in critical discussion of complex issues of race, class, and gender.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
06/14/2021
Bud, Not Buddy
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In this historical fiction unit, students learn about the Great Depression through the eyes of a ten-year-old African-American boy by reading the core text Bud, Not Buddy. In Bud, Not Buddy, students join Bud on his quest to find his father. In doing so, students are exposed to what life was like during the Great Depression, especially for African-Americans. Over the course of the novel, students will grapple with lying, and if lying is always bad or if it can sometimes be a good thing, as they witness Bud lying as a way to survive. Students will also analyze and explore the idea of maturity and what it means to act one’s age versus acting more mature as Bud finds himself in situations most ten-year-olds will never experience. The theme of compassion and kindness also arises over the course of the novel. Students will analyze how the compassionate actions of others help Bud on his journey, while deepening their understanding of why it’s always important to help others, even when times are tough. It is our hope that this unit, in conjunction with the rest of the fourth-grade sequence, will help students develop empathy and understanding for the experiences of others.

As readers, this unit serves as the culminating unit for the year. Therefore, the majority of the unit focuses on spiraling strategies. Students should be pushed daily to summarize key events, analyze characters and setting, and figure out the meaning of unknown words. Students should also be pushed to use the information they learn from the nonfiction text about the Great Depression to confirm and deepen their understanding of what life was like during the Great Depression.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Match Fishtank
Provider Set:
Fishtank ELA
Date Added:
01/01/2017
C.A.T.C.H. Annotation = 3-step process to Critical Thinking!
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Students learn how to annotate texts through the process of C.A.T.C.H. Then, they will use their annotations to make meaning by inferring/interpreting and evaluating/making judgments. Through this 10 1/2 minute video instruction and three handouts students will learn and practice an easy to remember 3-step process to critical thinking that will make their learning visible and help them discover how and why they can make meaning out of everything they read, see, and hear. Now they will have ready answers for discussions, questions, essay-writing, and quizzes.

Subject:
Communication
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Laura Harris
Date Added:
06/14/2021
Call of the Wild
Rating

Students read literary and informational texts about human interaction with animals and nature. They understand how authors portray animals to serve a purpose and make a comment about human interaction with animals. Students then explore scientific and personal accounts of animal cognition to express their understanding of Jack London’s portrayal of Buck and his interaction with humans in The Call of the Wild.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Unit of Study
Author:
LDOE
Date Added:
05/23/2021
Chalk Talk Protocol with Hidden Figures
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

In this lesson various quotes that are stated by characters in Hidden FIgures are written on chart paper. Students will use the chalk talk protocol to write explaing their thoughts, connections, and questions about the quote first and then respond to what their classmates have written. Students will move in small groups from paper to paper guided by a timer. After they have finished, students will discuss big ideas on the chart paper and then discuss and share out how this quote teaches us about the person based on inferences we have made with this activity. Do we think this what the author intended us to think? This protocol can be used for any book or topic in many subject areas. There will also be reflection as an informative assessment.

Subject:
Educational Technology
Elementary Education
Higher Education
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Interactive
Lesson
Reading
Author:
Julia Hatcher
Date Added:
06/14/2021
Charlotte's Web
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In this unit, students will explore the meaning of true friendship by reading Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White. Charlotte’s Web, a classic novel written in 1952, clearly illustrates how difficult and scary it can be to make a friend, yet how rewarding a true friendship really is. Over the course of the novel, students will consider what it means to be a good friend, whether or not friendship is always easy, and whether or not conflicts and struggle really are an important part of strengthening friendships. By deeply connecting with the characters, students will learn about the power of helping others, how creativity and determination can help solve problems, and that people can and do change. Students will also begin to understand the cycle of life and beauty, and the emotional responses that come with death through the eyes of Wilbur. It is our hope that this unit, in connection with other units, will provide the foundation for developing empathy and understanding about true friendship and life.

Charlotte’s Web was chosen not only because of the strong theme of friendship and life, but because it is a classic in children’s literature. Charlotte’s Web was written in the early 1950s and contains themes and language that are more archaic than other texts from the year. Therefore, students will learn how to analyze themes, settings, characters and language that are less familiar and relatable.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Match Fishtank
Provider Set:
Fishtank ELA
Date Added:
01/01/2017