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Artificial Intelligence, Fall 2010
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This course introduces students to the basic knowledge representation, problem solving, and learning methods of artificial intelligence. Upon completion of 6.034, students should be able to develop intelligent systems by assembling solutions to concrete computational problems, understand the role of knowledge representation, problem solving, and learning in intelligent-system engineering, and appreciate the role of problem solving, vision, and language in understanding human intelligence from a computational perspective.

Subject:
Computer Science
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Winston, Patrick Henry
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Automata, Computability, and Complexity, Spring 2011
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This course provides a challenging introduction to some of the central ideas of theoretical computer science. Beginning in antiquity, the course will progress through finite automata, circuits and decision trees, Turing machines and computability, efficient algorithms and reducibility, the P versus NP problem, NP-completeness, the power of randomness, cryptography and one-way functions, computational learning theory, and quantum computing. It examines the classes of problems that can and cannot be solved by various kinds of machines. It tries to explain the key differences between computational models that affect their power.

Subject:
Computer Science
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Aaronson, Scott
Date Added:
01/01/2011
BrainVentures Animal Traits for Survival
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This Roadmap looks at the physical trait of a Hermit Crab that help it survive. The reading is leveled and guides the students to compare and recognize cause and effect within the reading. Students will then create a virtual aquarium and hermit crab of their own. Students will then learn how to use the animation feature of the Flipbook by making their hermit crab walk across the aquarium. Next they are open to make a book of their favorite animals in different environment. They will use a label to name the physical traits and tell how they help them survive.

Subject:
Information Science
Reading Informational Text
Zoology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider Set:
Collabrify Roadmap Center
Author:
Monique Coulman
Date Added:
03/17/2020
Remix
CTE Lesson Plan on Cybersecurity
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The purpose of this lesson is to learn how to determine the main ideas from digital sources. on Cybersecurity.Students will identify the site content and information on bias.Students will synthesize their findings from three websites, cite examples, and provide their own analysis in a 5-minute speech.

Subject:
Computer Science
Information Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Julia Reynolds
Date Added:
08/07/2019
CTE Lesson Plan on Cybersecurity
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The purpose of this lesson is to learn how to determine the main ideas from digital sources. on Cybersecurity.Students will identify the site content and information on bias.Students will synthesize their findings from three websites, cite examples, and provide their own analysis in a 5-minute speech.

Subject:
Computer Science
Information Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Patti Shayne
Date Added:
08/03/2019
Communications and Information Policy, Spring 2006
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This course provides an introduction to the technology and policy context of public communications networks, through critical discussion of current issues in communications policy and their historical roots. The course focuses on underlying rationales and models for government involvement and the complex dynamics introduced by co-evolving technologies, industry structure, and public policy objectives. Cases drawn from cellular, fixed-line, and Internet applications include evolution of spectrum policy and current proposals for reform; the migration to broadband and implications for universal service policies; and property rights associated with digital content. The course lays a foundation for thesis research in this domain.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Field,Frank
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Computational Methods of Scientific Programming, Fall 2011
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This course introduces programming languages and techniques used by physical scientists: FORTRAN, C, C++, MATLAB, and Mathematica. Emphasis is placed on program design, algorithm development and verification, and comparative advantages and disadvantages of different languages.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Chris Hill
Thomas Herring
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Computational Thinking Concepts Guide from Google
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In this guide you will find eleven terms and definitions for Computational Thinking (CT) concepts. These concepts can be incorporated into existing lesson plans, projects, and demonstrations in order to infuse CT into any disciplinary subject.

The original copy of this information was created by Google and shared at https://docs.google.com/document/d/1i0wg-BMG3TdwsShAyH_0Z1xpFnpVcMvpYJceHGWex_c/edit. The only change made has been the format of the document. All information is exactly the same.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Computer Science
Engineering
Information Science
Mathematics
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Gina Loveless
Date Added:
08/28/2020
Computer Language Engineering, Spring 2010
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This course analyzes issues associated with the implementation of higher-level programming languages. Topics covered include: fundamental concepts, functions, and structures of compilers, the interaction of theory and practice, and using tools in building software. The course includes a multi-person project on compiler design and implementation.

Subject:
Computer Science
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Amarasinghe, Saman
Rinard, Martin
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Convex Analysis and Optimization, Spring 2012
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This course will focus on fundamental subjects in convexity, duality, and convex optimization algorithms. The aim is to develop the core analytical and algorithmic issues of continuous optimization, duality, and saddle point theory using a handful of unifying principles that can be easily visualized and readily understood.

Subject:
Engineering
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Dimitri Bertsekas
Date Added:
01/01/2012
Cultural Representation in the Media
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 Advertisements can present a biased cultural representation that can affect our perceptions of others.  For example, a television show may show commercials with some groups of people more than others. A magazine may have advertisements and articles representing a certain type of people in a way that reinforces stereotypes.  Students need to be taught to recognize the culture that is being represented in the media they consume as well as the cultures that are absent from the same media.This is Part 5 of a 5 Part Unit: Media Manipulation: What Are They Really Saying?

Subject:
Information Science
Visual Arts
World Cultures
Marketing
Electronic Technology
Film and Music Production
English Language Arts
Cultural Geography
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Patricia Denton
Date Added:
08/05/2019
Cyberpolitics in International Relations: Theory, Methods, Policy, Fall 2011
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This course focuses on cyberspace and its implications for private and public, sub-national, national, and international actors and entities.

Subject:
Information Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
David D. Clark
Nazli Choucri
Stuart Madnick
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Data Management, Spring 2016
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The MIT Libraries Data Management Group hosts a set of workshops during IAP and throughout the year to assist MIT faculty and researchers with data set control, maintenance, and sharing. This resource contains a selection of presentations from those workshops. Topics include an introduction to data management, details on data sharing and storage, data management using the DMPTool, file organization, version control, and an overview of the open data requirements of various funding sources.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Date Added:
01/01/2016
Database Systems, Fall 2010
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This course relies on primary readings from the database community to introduce graduate students to the foundations of database systems, focusing on basics such as the relational algebra and data model, schema normalization, query optimization, and transactions. It is designed for students who have taken 6.033 (or equivalent); no prior database experience is assumed, though students who have taken an undergraduate course in databases are encouraged to attend.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Curino, Carlo
Madden, Samuel
Morris, Robert
Stonebraker, Michael
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Digital Citizenship
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This is a hyperdoc with links to a variety of videos and resources around the concept of digital citizenship. It includes definitions, how-to videos, and links to resources about how to handle cyberbullying.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Cathy Costello
Date Added:
05/19/2021
Does Science Fiction Predict the Future Lesson Plan.pdf
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Students will learn the potential costs and benefits of social media, digital consumption, and our relationship with technology as a society in the three-week lesson. This inquiry based unit of study will answer the following questions:

Essential Question: How can we use science fiction’s ability to predict the future to help humanity?

Supportive Questions 1: What predictions of future development has science fiction accurately made in the past? This can include technology, privacy, medicine, social justice, political, environmental, education, and economic.

Supportive Question 2: What predictions for future development in contemporary science fiction are positive for the future of humanity? What factors need to begin in your lifetime to make these predictions reality?

Supportive Question 3: What predictions for future development in contemporary science fiction are negative for the future of humanity? What factors need to begin in your lifetime to stop these negative outcomes?

Subject:
Information Science
Electronic Technology
Educational Technology
Composition and Rhetoric
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Reading
Unit of Study
Author:
Morgen Larsen
Date Added:
06/12/2021
Dynamic Programming and Stochastic Control, Fall 2015
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The course covers the basic models and solution techniques for problems of sequential decision making under uncertainty (stochastic control). We will consider optimal control of a dynamical system over both a finite and an infinite number of stages. This includes systems with finite or infinite state spaces, as well as perfectly or imperfectly observed systems. We will also discuss approximation methods for problems involving large state spaces. Applications of dynamic programming in a variety of fields will be covered in recitations.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Dimitri Bertsekas
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Exploring the Roots of Today's #BLM Movement: Slavery in Colonial America
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This unit integrates collaboration on a research-based teaching unit, but not entirely based on what's available in the library. The librarian and teacher are involved in co-planning, co-teaching, and co-assessing this unit of study. Each person brings their own expertise to the table and they are seen as equals. The librarian is also able to effectively teach the students how to evaluate the resources that the libguide provides them, using other selected resources as non-examples for comparison's sake.

Subject:
Information Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Kerry Guiliano
Date Added:
08/08/2020
Free Practice Tests
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Public Domain
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Over 100 Practice Tests Exams & Prep Free
to help students and others prepare for their high school, college, career and much more.
That will add value for sure for your website visitors

Subject:
Engineering
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Information Science
Accounting
Communication
Automotive Technology and Repair
Education
Material Type:
Full Course
Date Added:
02/24/2022
Gender and Advertising
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Using their new skills in deconstructing advertisements, students will look at advertisements through the lens of gender.  Students will be encouraged to critically analyze the cultural stereotypes for men and women. Students will deconstruct advertisements based on gender representation.Rationale: Students will begin to see how believing in stereotypes can lead towards a negative self image for men and women.  This is Part 4 of a 5 part Unit: Media Manipulation: What Are They Really Saying?

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Information Science
Graphic Arts
Marketing
Film and Music Production
Graphic Design
English Language Arts
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Patricia Denton
Date Added:
08/05/2019
A Gentle Introduction to Programming Using Python, January IAP 2011
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This course will provide a gentle, yet intense, introduction to programming using Python for highly motivated students with little or no prior experience in programming. The course will focus on planning and organizing programs, as well as the grammar of the Python programming language. The course is designed to help prepare students for 6.01 Introduction to EECS. 6.01 assumes some knowledge of Python upon entering; the course material for 6.189 has been specially designed to make sure that concepts important to 6.01 are covered. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subject:
Computer Science
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Canelake, Sarina
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Health Information Systems to Improve Quality of Care in Resource-Poor Settings, Spring 2012
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This course is a collaborative offering of Sana, Partners in Health, and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). The goal of this course is the development of innovations in information systems for developing countries that will (1) translate into improvement in health outcomes, (2) strengthen the existing organizational infrastructure, and (3) create a collaborative ecosystem to maximize the value of these innovations. The course will be taught by guest speakers who are internationally recognized experts in the field and who, with their operational experiences, will outline the challenges they faced and detail how these were addressed.This OCW site combines resources from the initial Spring 2011 offering of the course (numbered HST.184) and the Spring 2012 offering (numbered HST.S14).

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Hamish Fraser
Ken Paik
Leo Celi
Peter Szolovits
Date Added:
01/01/2012
ISearch BINGO, Grades 6-8
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Activity to teach students about various online resources. In Michigan, we would change Isearch to MEL.org.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Erica Clay
Date Added:
08/06/2020
Information Exploration: Becoming a Savvy Scholar, Fall 2006
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This freshman course explores the scientific publication cycle, primary vs. secondary sources, and online and in-print bibliographic databases; how to search, find, evaluate, and cite information; indexing and abstracting; using special resources (e.g. patents) and "grey literature" (e.g. technical reports and conference proceedings); conducting Web searches; and constructing literature reviews.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Locknar, Angela
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Information Literacy
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To be information literate, a person must be able to recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information. By the end of this unit you will be able to Define Information Literacy, Define the four domains that fall under Metaliterate Learners, Identify a lack of knowledge in a subject area, Identify a search topic/question and define it using simple terminology, Articulate current knowledge on a topic, Recognize a need for information and data to achieve a specific end and define limits to the information need, and Manage time effectively to complete a search.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
Lumen Learning
Provider Set:
Candela Courseware
Date Added:
02/16/2018
The Information Literacy User’s Guide: An Open, Online Textbook
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Good researchers have a host of tools at their disposal that make navigating today’s complex information ecosystem much more manageable. Gaining the knowledge, abilities, and self-reflection necessary to be a good researcher helps not only in academic settings, but is invaluable in any career, and throughout one’s life. The Information Literacy User’s Guide will start you on this route to success.The Information Literacy User’s Guide is based on two current models in information literacy: The 2011 version of The Seven Pillars Model, developed by the Society of College, National and University Libraries in the United Kingdom and the conception of information literacy as a metaliteracy, a model developed by one of this book’s authors in conjunction with Thomas Mackey, Dean of the Center for Distance Learning at SUNY Empire State College. These core foundations ensure that the material will be relevant to today’s students.The Information Literacy User’s Guide introduces students to critical concepts of information literacy as defined for the information-infused and technology-rich environment in which they find themselves. This book helps students examine their roles as information creators and sharers and enables them to more effectively deploy related skills. This textbook includes relatable case studies and scenarios, many hands-on exercises, and interactive quizzes.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Textbook
Provider:
State University of New York
Provider Set:
OpenSUNY Textbooks
Author:
Allison Hosier and Tor Loney
Daryl Bullis
Deborah Bernnard
Greg Bobish
Irina Holden
Jenna Hecker
Trudi Jacobson
Date Added:
02/16/2018
Information Systems
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CC BY
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Students need to understand systems and the systems concept, and they need to understand the role of ICT in enabling systems. Students will learn the characteristics of good systems (e.g., intuitive, likable, error-resistant, fast, flexible, and the like). Knowing the characteristics of good systems will permit students to demand well designed systems and to suggest how existing systems should be changed. Students need to understand the affordances, directions, and limits of hardware, software, and networks in both personal and organizational dimensions. They also need to appreciate that, as technical capabilities change and new ones arise, more opportunities to apply ICT for efficiency, effectiveness, and innovation are afforded. They need to understand the process for developing and implementing new or improved systems and the activities of IS professionals in this process.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Open Textbooks
Author:
Richard T. Watson
Date Added:
10/28/2014
Information Systems
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Students need to understand systems and the systems concept, and they need to understand the role of ICT in enabling systems. Students will learn the characteristics of good systems (e.g., intuitive, likable, error-resistant, fast, flexible, and the like). Knowing the characteristics of good systems will permit students to demand well designed systems and to suggest how existing systems should be changed. Students need to understand the affordances, directions, and limits of hardware, software, and networks in both personal and organizational dimensions. They also need to appreciate that, as technical capabilities change and new ones arise, more opportunities to apply ICT for efficiency, effectiveness, and innovation are afforded. They need to understand the process for developing and implementing new or improved systems and the activities of IS professionals in this process.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Open Textbooks
Author:
Richard T. Watson
Date Added:
10/28/2014
Information Technology Essentials, Spring 2005
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Subject covers technology concepts and trends underlying current and future developments in information technology, and fundamental principles for the effective use of computer-based information systems. Special emphasis on networks and distributed computing, including the web. Other topics include: hardware and operating systems, software development tools and processes, relational databases, security and cryptography, enterprise applications and business process redesign, and electronic commerce. Hands-on exposure to Web, database, and graphical user interface (GUI) tools. Primarily for Sloan master's students.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Malone, Thomas
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Information Theory, Spring 2010
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6.441 offers an introduction to the quantitative theory of information and its applications to reliable, efficient communication systems. Topics include mathematical definition and properties of information, source coding theorem, lossless compression of data, optimal lossless coding, noisy communication channels, channel coding theorem, the source channel separation theorem, multiple access channels, broadcast channels, Gaussian noise, and time-varying channels.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
MŠČĽard, Muriel
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Information and Communication Technologies in Community Development, Spring 2004
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This practicum subject integrates theory and practice through the design, implementation, and evaluation of a comprehensive community information infrastructure that promotes democratic involvement and informs community development projects. Students work with Lawrence Community Works, Inc. to involve constituents and generate solutions to an important planning problem in the City of Lawrence, Massachusetts. Final project presentations take place in a public forum, and serve to inform future development of the information infrastructure. Subject begins with an overview of the digital divide, e-government, public participation GIS, and neighborhood information systems. Subject includes a reflection component and a deliberate investigation of race, class, and gender dynamics.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Hoyt, Lorlene M.
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Introduction To MATLAB Programming, Fall 2011
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This course is intended to assist undergraduates with learning the basics of programming in general and programming MATLAB in particular.

Subject:
Computer Science
Information Science
Functions
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Yossi Farjoun
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Introduction to Algorithms, Fall 2011
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This course provides an introduction to mathematical modeling of computational problems. It covers the common algorithms, algorithmic paradigms, and data structures used to solve these problems. The course emphasizes the relationship between algorithms and programming, and introduces basic performance measures and analysis techniques for these problems.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Erik Demaine
Srinivas Devadas
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Introduction to C++, January IAP 2011
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This is a fast-paced introductory course to the C++ programming language. It is intended for those with little programming background, though prior programming experience will make it easier, and those with previous experience will still learn C++-specific constructs and concepts. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subject:
Computer Science
Information Science
Functions
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Dunietz, Jesse
Kovacs, Geza
Marrero, John
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Introduction to C Memory Management and C++ Object-Oriented Programming, January IAP 2010
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CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

" Ever hang your head in shame after your Python program wasn't as fast as your friend's C program? Ever wish you could use objects without having to use Java? Join us for this fun introduction to C and C++! We will take you through a tour that will start with writing simple C programs, go deep into the caves of C memory manipulation, resurface with an introduction to using C++ classes, dive deeper into advanced C++ class use and the C++ Standard Template Libraries. We'll wrap up by teaching you some tricks of the trade that you may need for tech interviews. We see this as a "C/C++ empowerment" course: we want you to come away understanding why you would want to use C over another language (control over memory, probably for performance reasons), why you would want to use C++ rather than C (objects), and how to be useful in C and C++. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month."

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kang, Eunsuk
Yang, Jean
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Introduction to C and C++, January IAP 2013
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CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This course provides a fast-paced introduction to the C and C++ programming languages. You will learn the required background knowledge, including memory management, pointers, preprocessor macros, object-oriented programming, and how to find bugs when you inevitably use any of those incorrectly. There will be daily assignments and a small-scale individual project. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Frank Li
Kyle Murray
Tom Lieber
Date Added:
01/01/2013
Introduction to Civic Online Reasoning for Distance Learning
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This collection of lessons represent adapted and remixed instructional content for teaching media literacy and specifically civic online reasoning through distance learning. These lessons take students through the steps necessary to source online content, verify evidence presented, and corroborate claims with other sources.

The original lesson plans are the work of Stanford History Education Group, licensed under CC 4.0. Please refer to the full text lesson plans at Stanford History Education Group’s, Civic Online Reasoning Curriculum for specifics regarding background, research findings, and additional curriculum for teaching media literacy in the twenty-first century.

Subject:
Information Science
Business and Communication
Journalism
Educational Technology
Reading Informational Text
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Author:
Adrienne Williams
Heather Galloway
Morgen Larsen
Rachel Obenchain
Stanford History Education Group-Civic Online Reasoning Project
Date Added:
06/12/2021
Introduction to Civic Online Reasoning for Distance Learning
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This collection of lessons represent adapted and remixed instructional content for teaching media literacy and specifically civic online reasoning through distance learning. These lessons take students through the steps necessary to source online content, verify evidence presented, and corroborate claims with other sources.

The original lesson plans are the work of Stanford History Education Group, licensed under CC 4.0. Please refer to the full text lesson plans at Stanford History Education Group’s, Civic Online Reasoning Curriculum for specifics regarding background, research findings, and additional curriculum for teaching media literacy in the twenty-first century.

Subject:
Information Science
Business and Communication
Journalism
Educational Technology
Reading Informational Text
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Author:
Adrienne Williams
Heather Galloway
Morgen Larsen
Rachel Obenchain
Stanford History Education Group-Civic Online Reasoning Project
Date Added:
08/10/2020
Introduction to Communication, Control, and Signal Processing, Spring 2010
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This course examines signals, systems and inference as unifying themes in communication, control and signal processing. Topics include input-output and state-space models of linear systems driven by deterministic and random signals; time- and transform-domain representations in discrete and continuous time; group delay; state feedback and observers; probabilistic models; stochastic processes, correlation functions, power spectra, spectral factorization; least-mean square error estimation; Wiener filtering; hypothesis testing; detection; matched filters.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Oppenheim, Alan V.
Verghese, George
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Introduction to Convex Optimization, Fall 2009
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This course aims to give students the tools and training to recognize convex optimization problems that arise in scientific and engineering applications, presenting the basic theory, and concentrating on modeling aspects and results that are useful in applications. Topics include convex sets, convex functions, optimization problems, least-squares, linear and quadratic programs, semidefinite programming, optimality conditions, and duality theory. Applications to signal processing, control, machine learning, finance, digital and analog circuit design, computational geometry, statistics, and mechanical engineering are presented. Students complete hands-on exercises using high-level numerical software. Acknowledgements The course materials were developed jointly by Prof. Stephen Boyd (Stanford), who was a visiting professor at MIT when this course was taught, and Prof. Lieven Vanderberghe (UCLA).

Subject:
Computer Science
Information Science
Finance
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Boyd, Stephen
Parrilo, Pablo
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Introduction to EECS II: Digital Communication Systems, Fall 2012
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An introduction to several fundamental ideas in electrical engineering and computer science, using digital communication systems as the vehicle. The three parts of the course - bits, signals, and packets - cover three corresponding layers of abstraction that form the basis of communication systems like the Internet. The course teaches ideas that are useful in other parts of EECS: abstraction, probabilistic analysis, superposition, time and frequency-domain representations, system design principles and trade-offs, and centralized and distributed algorithms. The course emphasizes connections between theoretical concepts and practice using programming tasks and some experiments with real-world communication channels.

Subject:
Computer Science
Engineering
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
George Verghese
Hari Balakrishnan
Date Added:
01/01/2012
Introduction to MATLAB, Spring 2008
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This course was offered as a non-credit program during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. The course, intended for students with no programming experience, provides the foundations of programming in MATLABĺ. Variables, arrays, conditional statements, loops, functions, and plots are explained. At the end of the course, students should be able to use MATLAB in their own work, and be prepared to deepen their MATLAB programming skills and tackle other languages for computing, such as Java, C++, or Python. The course mostly follows the official MATLAB Manual, available from The MathWorks. We will cover material from chapters 2-5. Technical Requirements:Special software is required to use some of the files in this course: .m.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Farjoun, Yossi
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Introduction to Nanoelectronics, Spring 2010
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Traditionally, progress in electronics has been driven by miniaturization. But as electronic devices approach the molecular scale, classical models for device behavior must be abandoned. To prepare for the next generation of electronic devices, this class teaches the theory of current, voltage and resistance from atoms up. To describe electrons at the nanoscale, we will begin with an introduction to the principles of quantum mechanics, including quantization, the wave-particle duality, wavefunctions and Schrĺ_dinger's equation. Then we will consider the electronic properties of molecules, carbon nanotubes and crystals, including energy band formation and the origin of metals, insulators and semiconductors. Electron conduction will be taught beginning with ballistic transport and concluding with a derivation of Ohm's law. We will then compare ballistic to bulk MOSFETs. The class will conclude with a discussion of possible fundamental limits to computation.

Subject:
Information Science
Electronic Technology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Baldo, Marc
Date Added:
01/01/2010
LabXchange
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LabXchange is an online community for learning, sharing, and collaboration.

Labs are places of exploration and discovery for every field imaginable. In this spirit, you can discover, engage, and share what you learn on LabXchange. We curate and create world-class digital content, delivered on a free, online platform that lets you integrate your learning and research experiences. Here, you take control of your learning and solve real-world problems as a community. Participation will always be free.

For information about upcoming professional development workshops, visit our blog!

Subject:
Environmental Science
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Information Science
Anatomy/Physiology
Biology
Genetics
Nutrition
Mathematics
Measurement and Data
Statistics and Probability
Physical Science
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Data Set
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Reading
Simulation
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Textbook
Date Added:
02/03/2022
Learning through Science and Story: Fossils Tell of Earth’s Changes
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Labs component for Grade 2: Module 2 of the EL Education K-8 Language Arts Curriculum. Labs provide students with an hour of engaging, hands-on play to build habits of character, literacy skills, and module-related content understanding. Labs are directly connected to the content of this language arts module, Fossils Tell of Earth's Changes, and should be implemented alongside the module lessons. For more information on Labs, please visit https://curriculum.eleducation.org/about-k-2-labs-and-ALL-block.

To access this resource, you will need to create a free account for the system on which it resides. This partner uses such data for funding requests to keep their resource growing and up-to-date. Also, these resources are openly-licensed for editing and re-sharing, EXCEPT for certain copyright-protected content (authentic texts, photographs, etc.) within the materials that are from outside sources. This outside content may not be reproduced or distributed (outside the scope of fair use or the EL Education Curriculum Terms of Use) without additional permissions from the content owner.

Subject:
Information Science
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Aliki Brandenberg
Ann O Squire
Kate Waters
Laurence Anholt
Shirley Raye Redmond
Susan Heinrichs Gray
Date Added:
05/19/2021
Lesson 3: Advertising Techniques- The Language of Persuasion
Unrestricted Use
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Students will use the Five Core Concepts and Five Key Questions to analyze and evaluate media messages.  These concepts will serve as the "Big Ideas" or the "Enduring Understanding" that students will need in order to become media literate.   Students will learn the Language of Persuasion used in advertising, specifically techniques that appeal to pathos (emotion), logos (logic), and ethos (credibility/character). They will use these techniques to analyze both print advertisements and television commercials. The lesson will culminate in the analysis of advertisements and the various techniques that they use as well as an evaluation of their effectiveness.This is Part 3 of a 5 Part Unit: Media Manipulation: What Are They Really Saying?

Subject:
Information Science
Visual Arts
Marketing
Film and Music Production
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Patricia Denton
Date Added:
08/05/2019
Mathematics for Computer Science, Fall 2010
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This course covers elementary discrete mathematics for computer science and engineering. It emphasizes mathematical definitions and proofs as well as applicable methods. Topics include formal logic notation, proof methods; induction, well-ordering; sets, relations; elementary graph theory; integer congruences; asymptotic notation and growth of functions; permutations and combinations, counting principles; discrete probability. Further selected topics may also be covered, such as recursive definition and structural induction; state machines and invariants; recurrences; generating functions.

Subject:
Computer Science
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Dijk, Marten van
Leighton, Tom
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Numerical Computation for Mechanical Engineers, Fall 2012
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This class introduces elementary programming concepts including variable types, data structures, and flow control. After an introduction to linear algebra and probability, it covers numerical methods relevant to mechanical engineering, including approximation (interpolation, least squares and statistical regression), integration, solution of linear and nonlinear equations, ordinary differential equations, and deterministic and probabilistic approaches. Examples are drawn from mechanical engineering disciplines, in particular from robotics, dynamics, and structural analysis. Assignments require MATLAB programming.

Subject:
Engineering
Information Science
Calculus
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Anthony Patera
Daniel Frey
Nicholas Hadjiconstantinou
Date Added:
01/01/2012
Parallel Computing, Fall 2011
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This is an advanced interdisciplinary introduction to applied parallel computing on modern supercomputers. It has a hands-on emphasis on understanding the realities and myths of what is possible on the world's fastest machines. We will make prominent use of the Julia Language software project.

Subject:
Computer Science
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Alan Edelman
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Pikler Triangle What It Is?Where To Buy And How To DIY?
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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The Pikler triangle is one of the Montessori learning method’s toys. Also, it goes by the name of Montessori Climber, But it has its roots linked to Dr.Emmi Pikler, who believed that the best way to teach your child something new is to let him move freely and build his confidence through play. He insisted on not putting your child in a compromising physical environment instead, let them be the master of their own body.

So the question is, what is this wooden toy with rainbow slides, or is it just a piece of furniture? You might not know it yet, or you may have a climber in your house, and you know what it is, but is it worth the amount you are spending?

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Alison
Date Added:
01/27/2021
Practical Information Technology Management, Spring 2005
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The course purpose is to provide the substance and skill necessary to make sound business decisions relating to information systems, and to work with senior line managers in the resolution of issues and problems in this area. Categories of issues which will be addressed in the course include: How do IT and its various manifestations in business, such as the Internet, affect current and future competitiveness? How do we align business strategy and plans with IT strategy and IT plans? How can we engage executives in learning and leading IT-related change? How do we implement new systems, change work behavior, manage projects? How should we organize and govern IT in an organization.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Gibson, Cyrus
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Practical Programming in C, January IAP 2010
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"This course provides a thorough introduction to the C programming language, the workhorse of the UNIX operating system and lingua franca of embedded processors and micro-controllers. The first two weeks will cover basic syntax and grammar, and expose students to practical programming techniques. The remaining lectures will focus on more advanced concepts, such as dynamic memory allocation, concurrency and synchronization, UNIX signals and process control, library development and usage. Daily programming Assignments and Labs and weekly laboratory exercises are required. Knowledge of C is highly marketable for summer internships, UROPs, and full-time positions in software and embedded systems development."

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Chikkerur, Sharat
Weller, Daniel
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Principles of Computer System Design: An Introduction, Spring 2009
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Principles of Computer System Design: An Introduction is published in two parts. Part I, containing chapters 1-6, is a traditional printed textbook published by Morgan Kaufman, an imprint of Elsevier. Part II, containing chapters 7-11, is available here as an open educational resource. This textbook, an introduction to the principles and abstractions used in the design of computer systems, is an outgrowth of notes written for 6.033 Computer System Engineering over a period of 40-plus years. Individual chapters are also used in other EECS subjects. There is also a Web site for the current 6.033 class with a lecture schedule that includes daily Assignments and Labs, lecture notes, and lecture slides. The 6.033 class Web site also contains a thirteen-year archive of class Assignments and Labs, design projects, and quizzes. Technical Requirements: Special software is required to use some of the files in this resource: .key, .ppt, and .zip.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kaashoek, M. Frans
Saltzer, Jerome H.
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Probabilistic Systems Analysis and Applied Probability, Fall 2010
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Welcome to 6.041/6.431, a subject on the modeling and analysis of random phenomena and processes, including the basics of statistical inference. Nowadays, there is broad consensus that the ability to think probabilistically is a fundamental component of scientific literacy. For example: The concept of statistical significance (to be touched upon at the end of this course) is considered by the Financial Times as one of "The Ten Things Everyone Should Know About Science". A recent Scientific American article argues that statistical literacy is crucial in making health-related decisions. Finally, an article in the New York Times identifies statistical data analysis as an upcoming profession, valuable everywhere, from Google and Netflix to the Office of Management and Budget. The aim of this class is to introduce the relevant models, skills, and tools, by combining mathematics with conceptual understanding and intuition.

Subject:
Computer Science
Information Science
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Bertsekas, Dimitri
Tsitsiklis, John
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Purposes, Processes, and Promises – The Civil Rights Litigation Schoolhouse
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This unit introduces students to the concept of civil rights litigation. It asks students to consider how the litigation process reflects the fundamental values and principles of American constitutional government. By the end of this unit, students should be prepared to talk about how the civil litigation process reflects these values and principles and to describe civil rights litigation and its current scope.
Lesson 1: What is Litigation?
Lesson 2: What are the Steps of Litigation?
Lesson 3: What is Civil Rights Litigation?

Subject:
Information Science
Reading Informational Text
U.S. History
General Law
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Civil Rights Litigation Clearinghouse
Date Added:
06/09/2020
Quantum Complexity Theory, Fall 2010
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This course is an introduction to quantum computational complexity theory, the study of the fundamental capabilities and limitations of quantum computers. Topics include complexity classes, lower bounds, communication complexity, proofs, advice, and interactive proof systems in the quantum world. The objective is to bring students to the research frontier.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Aaronson, Scott
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Quantum Information Science, Spring 2006
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This course examines quantum computation and quantum information. Topics include quantum circuits, quantum Fourier transform and search algorithms, physical implementations, the quantum operations formalism, quantum error correction, stabilizer and Calderbank-Shor-Steans codes, fault tolerant quantum computation, quantum data compression, entanglement, and proof of the security of quantum cryptography. Prior knowledge of quantum mechanics and basic information theory is required.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Shor, Peter
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Research Seminar on Urban Information Systems, Fall 2005
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Advanced seminar extends computer and analytic skills developed in the other subjects in this sequence into a research environment. Students present a structured discussion of a journal article representative of current research in Planning Decision Support Systems, and complete an approved short research project. Suggested research projects include topics related to ongoing research projects of the Computer Resource Laboratory. Seminar participants and invited guests will lead critical discussions of current literature and ongoing research. Each student will be responsible for identifying, reviewing, and presenting one structured discussion of articles from the current literature that are relevant to their research topic. The remaining time will be spent working on individual projects or thesis proposals. This fall, the seminar will focus on the following core issues that underlie most implementations of urban information systems and decision support tools: the sustainable acquisition and representation of urban knowledge; the emergent technological infrastructure for supporting metropolitan decision-making; and the innovative organizational and institutional arrangements that can take advantage of modern urban information systems.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ferreira, Joseph, Jr.
Date Added:
01/01/2005
STAR: Software Tools for Academics and Researchers, Spring 2012
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The Software Tools for Academics and Researchers (STAR) program at MIT seeks to bridge the divide between scientific research and the classroom. Understanding and applying research methods in the classroom setting can be challenging due to time constraints and the need for advanced equipment and facilities. The multidisciplinary STAR team collaborates with faculty from MIT and other educational institutions to design software exploring core scientific research concepts. The goal of STAR is to develop innovative and intuitive teaching tools for classroom use. All of the STAR educational tools are freely available. To complement the educational software, the STAR website contains curriculum components/modules which can facilitate the use of STAR educational tools in a variety of educational settings. Students, teachers, and professors should feel welcome to download software and curriculum modules for their own use. Online Publication

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Date Added:
01/01/2012
Signals and Systems, Fall 2011
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This course covers the fundamentals of signal and system analysis, focusing on representations of discrete-time and continuous-time signals (singularity functions, complex exponentials and geometrics, Fourier representations, Laplace and Z transforms, sampling) and representations of linear, time-invariant systems (difference and differential equations, block diagrams, system functions, poles and zeros, convolution, impulse and step responses, frequency responses). Applications are drawn broadly from engineering and physics, including feedback and control, communications, and signal processing.

Subject:
Engineering
Information Science
Physics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Dennis Freeman
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Social Issues Blog
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Students will explore social issues that plague our society and the world to find an issue they are passionate about or are interested in learning more about.Through a process of questioning, students will develop research questions that they will seek the answers to by conducting research of a variety of sources both in print and digital.Students will create a blog site to share their research findings and write 8 blog posts, each focusing on answering a different question or aspect of their social issue, using evidence from credible sources. Their blogs will be published and shared with an authentic audience.

Subject:
Information Science
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Author:
Courtney Baker
Date Added:
05/31/2021
Solid-State Circuits, Fall 2010
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6.301 is a course in analog circuit analysis and design. We cover the tools and methods necessary for the creative design of useful circuits using active devices. The class stresses insight and intuition, applied to the design of transistor circuits and the estimation of their performance. We concentrate on circuits using the bipolar junction transistor, but the techniques that we study can be equally applied to circuits using JFETs, MOSFETs, MESFETs, future exotic devices, or even vacuum tubes.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Roberge, James
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Spatial Database Management and Advanced Geographic Information Systems, Spring 2003
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Extends the computing and geographic information systems (GIS) skills developed in 11.520 to include spatial data management in client/server environments and advanced GIS techniques. First half covers the content of 11.523, introducing database management concepts, SQL (Structured Query Language), and enterprise-class database management software. Second half explores advanced features and the customization features of GIS software that perform analyses for decision support that go beyond basic thematic mapping. Includes the half-semester GIS project of 11.524 that studies a real-world planning issue.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ferreira, Joseph, Jr.
Date Added:
01/01/2003
User Interface Design and Implementation, Spring 2011
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This course examines human-computer interaction in the context of graphical user interfaces. The course covers human capabilities, design principles, prototyping techniques, evaluation techniques, and the implementation of graphical user interfaces. Deliverables include short programming assignments and a semester-long group project. Students taking the graduate version also have readings from current literature and additional assignments.

Subject:
Computer Science
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Robert Miller
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Workshop in IT: Collaborative Innovation Networks, Fall 2011
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Diversity begets creativity - in this seminar we tap the amazing power of swarm creativity on the Web by studying and working together as Collaborative Innovation Networks (COINs). As interdisciplinary teams of MIT management, SCAD design, University of Cologne informatics, and Aalto University software engineering students we will explore how to discover latest trends on the Web, and how to make them succeed in online social networks. We study a wide range of methods for predictive analytics (coolhunting) and online social marketing (coolfarming), mostly based on social network analysis and the emerging science of collaboration. Students will also learn to use our own unique MIT-developed Condor tool for Web mining, social network analysis, and trend prediction.

Subject:
Information Science
Business and Communication
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Peter Gloor
Date Added:
01/01/2011