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  • Hydrology
Exploring the Water Cycle
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Students will observe/investigate the movement of water through the different stages of the water cycle and determine what drives this cycle. Students are asked to think about what precipitation is then watch a video about why the water cycle is important. They observe a simple version of the water cycle and take some notes. Students are asked what stages require solar radiation, which require water to give off heat, and which are driven by the force of gravity. The teacher does several different demonstrations while students fill in a sheet that has the students recording their observations of different processes in the water cycle and how energy is involved. Students build their understanding of the water cycle through the different models that are shown or experienced. The culminating activity has them create their own model of the water cycle from the viewpoint of a water molecule including the processes, the energy involved, and gravity.

Subject:
Hydrology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
NASA
National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)
Provider Set:
NGSS@NSTA
Date Added:
02/16/2018
Fresh or Salty?
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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Between 70 and 75% of the Earth's surface is covered with water and there exists still more water in the atmosphere and underground in aquifers. In this lesson, students learn about water bodies on the planet Earth and their various uses and qualities. They will learn about several ways that engineers are working to maintain and conserve water sources. They will also think about their role in water conservation.

Subject:
Engineering
Hydrology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Janet Yowell
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Sara Born
Date Added:
09/18/2014
How Clean is that Water?
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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This lesson plan helps students understand the factors that affect water quality and the conditions that allow for different animals and plants to survive. Students will look at the effects of water quality on various water-related activities and describe water as an environmental, economic and social resource. The students will also learn how engineers use water quality information to make decisions about stream modifications.

Subject:
Engineering
Hydrology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Janet Yowell
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Melissa Straten
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Leaf it to Me
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This is one activity that is part of a larger unit on the Hydrologic Cycle. Students place a bag around a living tree limb or bush, making sure it is sealed. The bag is left there for at least 2 hours. Water will have collected in a corner of the bag. Students explore transpiration by capturing water that plants release through their leaves.

Subject:
Hydrology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)
National Weather Service
Provider Set:
NGSS@NSTA
Date Added:
02/16/2018
The Rain Man
Rating

This is an activity that is part of a larger unit on the Hydrologic Cycle. Students create “precipitation” by suspending a bag of ice over a container with hot water. The water vapor in the air condenses on the bag. When enough water accumulates the water begins to join together and will eventually drip back into the container.

Subject:
Hydrology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)
National Weather Service
Provider Set:
NGSS@NSTA
Date Added:
02/16/2018
Unit 6.1: "Water on the Move": The Water Cycle
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Students explore the water cycle (hydrologic cycle) and how human activity can alter this cycle but not stop it. Students work to describe why a local community is having flooding problems and evaluate proposed solutions to address this problem.

Subject:
Hydrology
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Mi-STAR
Date Added:
12/29/2017
Water, Water Everywhere
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Students learn about floods, discovering that different types of floods occur from different water sources, but primarily from heavy rainfall. While floods occur naturally and have benefits such as creating fertile farmland, students learn that with the increase in human population in flood-prone areas, floods are become increasingly problematic. Both natural and manmade factors contribute to floods. Students learn what makes floods dangerous and what engineers design to predict, control and survive floods.

Subject:
Engineering
Hydrology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Denise Carlson
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Timothy Nicklas
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Who's Down the Well?
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Drinking water comes from many different sources, including surface water and groundwater. Environmental engineers analyze the physical properties of groundwater to predict how and where surface contaminants will travel. In this lesson, students will learn about several possible scenarios of contamination to drinking water. They will analyze the movement of example contaminants through groundwater such as environmental engineers must do (i.e., engineers identify and analyze existing contamination of water sources in order to produce high quality drinking water for consumers).

Subject:
Engineering
Hydrology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Janet Yowell
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Melissa Straten
Date Added:
09/18/2014