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  • Zoology
Backyard Bug Bonanza
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Step outside and discover the diversity of insect life in your neighborhood. Insects are the world’s most diverse group of living things, with over 950,000 identified species and counting. You might think that you’d need to travel to the Amazon to study insects, but they can be found practically everywhere—including right where you happen to be.

Subject:
Zoology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Exploratorium
Provider Set:
Science Snacks
Date Added:
09/04/2019
BrainVentures Animal Traits for Survival
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This Roadmap looks at the physical trait of a Hermit Crab that help it survive. The reading is leveled and guides the students to compare and recognize cause and effect within the reading. Students will then create a virtual aquarium and hermit crab of their own. Students will then learn how to use the animation feature of the Flipbook by making their hermit crab walk across the aquarium. Next they are open to make a book of their favorite animals in different environment. They will use a label to name the physical traits and tell how they help them survive.

Subject:
Information Science
Reading Informational Text
Zoology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider Set:
Collabrify Roadmap Center
Author:
Monique Coulman
Date Added:
03/17/2020
Building Background Knowledge: Frogs and the Research Process
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In Unit 2, students will build their ability to read and understand informational text and begin to build their knowledge of frogs through closely reading excerpts of the informational text Everything You Need to Know about Frogs and Other Slippery Creatures. Students will use the information gained in reading these excerpts to help them write answers to the questions generated in Unit 1 after reading poems and narratives about frogs. For a mid-unit assessment, students will demonstrate their reading skills through reading a new text about reptiles and amphibians, and they will gather information to answer a research question.
In the second half of the unit, students will continue with the same central text and build their knowledge by studying three "freaky frogs" that have specific adaptations according to where they live: the glass frog, the Amazon horned frog, and the water-holding frog. They will read about these frogs to answer this question in an informative paragraph: How does where a frog lives affect how it looks and/or acts? In the End of Unit 2 Assessment, students read another excerpt of text about the poison dart frog, gather information to answer a research question, and write an on-demand informative paragraph to answer the question.
RI.3.1, RI.3.3, RI.3.4, RI.3.5, RI.3.7, RI.3.8, W.3.2, W.3.7, W.3.8, L.3.1d,e, L.3.4

Subject:
Elementary Education
Composition and Rhetoric
Reading Informational Text
Zoology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Date Added:
03/30/2021
Discovering Genes Associated with Diseases and Traits in Dogs
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In this video module, students learn how scientists use genetic information from dogs to find out which gene (out of all 20,000 dog genes) is associated with any specific trait or disease of interest. This method involves comparing hundreds of dogs with the trait to hundreds of dogs not displaying the trait, and examining which position on the dog DNA is correlated with the trait (i.e. has one DNA sequence in dogs with the trait but another DNA sequence in dogs not displaying the trait). Students will also learn something about the history of dog breeds and how this history helps us find genes.

Subject:
Biology
Genetics
Zoology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Elinor Karlsson
Date Added:
04/07/2020
Discovering Genes Associated with Diseases and Traits in Dogs
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CC BY-NC-SA
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In this video module, students learn how scientists use genetic information from dogs to find out which gene (out of all 20,000 dog genes) is associated with any specific trait or disease of interest. This method involves comparing hundreds of dogs with the trait to hundreds of dogs not displaying the trait, and examining which position on the dog DNA is correlated with the trait (i.e. has one DNA sequence in dogs with the trait but another DNA sequence in dogs not displaying the trait). Students will also learn something about the history of dog breeds and how this history helps us find genes.

Subject:
Biology
Genetics
Zoology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. Blossoms
Author:
Elinor Karlsson
Date Added:
02/15/2018
Major Authors: America's Literary Scientists, Fall 2010
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Global exploration in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries radically changed Western science, orienting philosophies of natural history to more focused fields like comparative anatomy, botany, and geology. In the United States, European scientific advances and home-grown ventures like the Wilkes Exploring Expedition to Antarctica and the Pacific inspired new endeavors in cartography, ethnography, zoology, and evolutionary theory, replacing rigid models of thought and classification with more fluid and active systems. They inspired literary authors as well. This class will examine some of the most remarkable of these authors--Herman Melville (Moby-Dick and "The Encantadas"), Henry David Thoreau (Walden), Sarah Orne Jewett (Country of the Pointed Firs), Edith Wharton (House of Mirth), Toni Morrison (A Mercy), among others--in terms of the subjects and methods they adopted, imaginatively and often critically, from the natural sciences.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Zoology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kelley, Wyn
Date Added:
01/01/2010